Yannick Nézet-Séguin

This Sunday at 1 pm, from a Philadelphia Orchestra concert this past May at Verizon Hall, Yannick is on the podium to conduct Barber’s Adagio for Strings, an ethereal meditation that has emerged as an iconic piece of 20th-century American music; Bartok’s First Violin Concerto, played by Lisa Batiashvili, one of the world’s most sought-after violinists; and the concert will conclude with that imposing orchestral cathedral of sound known as Bruckner’s Symphony No.

Yannick Nezet-Seguin leads the Philadelphia Orchestra at Verizon Hall in a program culminating in Beethoven's monumental Symphony No. 3, "Eroica," originally intended as a grand and heroic tribute to Napoleon. Upon learning, however, that Napoleon had crowned himself Emperor of all Europe, Beethoven scratched out the dedication with such vigor that he tore through the paper. This is music that succeeds in creating a new architecture for the symphonic form, and it supplied ignition for the Romantic style in music.

Also on the program, Richard Strauss's Metamorphosen for 23 solo strings, which opens with a haunting rhythm clearly quoting the funeral march of Beethoven’s "Eroica." The intensity and pathos is that of a mature composer, nearing the end of his career, who has witnessed the World War II destruction of Europe, and stands in stark contrast  to compositions of the younger Strauss we've heard in earlier broadcasts this season.

Filling out the program is Shostakovich’s Cello Concerto No. 1, written for the great cellist Mstislav Rostropovich and given its U.S. premiere (and first recording) by him with The Philadelphia Orchestra and Eugene Ormandy in 1959.  Our soloist is German-Canadian cellist Johannes Moser, a young virtuoso who will perform this fiendish concerto, which, like the 10th and 11th symphonies heard elsewhere in the 2013/2014 season, was written following the death of Stalin, and marks a return to greater creative freedom for Shostakovich.

Here's Johannes Moser performing in 2011. During intermission, WRTI's Susan Lewis will speak with the young cellist.

Program:
Strauss - Metamorphosen
Shostakovich - Cello Concerto No. 1
Beethoven - Symphony No. 3 ("Eroica")
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Johannes Moser - Cello

That's the Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI, Sunday, October 5, 1 to 3:30 pm. Don't miss it!

You can listen to our 90.1 FM broadcast, or online here.

Gregg Whiteside is producer and host.

Both Sergei Rachmaninoff and Richard Strauss had long and fruitful relationships with The Philadelphia Orchestra. Rachmaninoff’s began in 1909 with his first appearance in this country at the Academy of Music. He would go on to write pieces specifically for the Orchestra, and collaborated in landmark recordings, including his Piano Concerto No. 3 that opens this Sunday's broadcast, from a concert in November, 2013.

On this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast, Music Director Yannick Nezet-Seguin conducts works by Britten and Strauss, along with Mahler's Symphony No. 4. As WRTI’s Jim Cotter reports, the German soprano in the Mahler work is singing a piece that is revered in her homeland.

Westminster Choir College at Rider University in Princeton, New Jersey is an epicenter for excellence in choral music. As WRTI’s Jim Cotter reports, one of Westminster’s choirs can be heard on WRTI on Sunday, July 13 at 1 pm, conducted by a now very well-known alum of the school.

Marco Borggreve

The Philadelphia Orchestra is performing a two-year cycle of Beethoven’s symphonies. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, although known to generations of music lovers, these great works continue to provide insights into Western musical heritage.

By the time this Sunday’s three-hour broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert airs, Principal Harp Elizabeth Hainen, the Philadelphia Orchestra, and Yannick Nezet-Seguin will have performed Tan Dun’s Nu Shu: The Secret Songs of Women three times in three different Chinese cities, as you might have been reading in the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Join us this Sunday as Yannick Nezet-Seguin conducts The Philadelphia Orchestra in a recorded program from late January, 2013 at Verizon Hall that features two composers who were not only contemporaries, but who actually met during the premiere of Tristan und Isolde in 1865, Richard Wagner and Anton Bruckner.

Yannick's Long Relationship with Bruckner

May 12, 2014

This Sunday at 1 pm on The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI - Music Director Yannick Nezet-Seguin takes to the podium to conduct a symphony by one of the composers who is closest to him.  WRTI’s Jim Cotter has more.

The Philadelphia Orchestra is going deeper into China than ever before, into the Hunan province where modern arts centers have only existed for a few years, and out of Macao's air-conditioned casinos for outdoor performing amid the ruins of a cathedral. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns will be there every step of the way.

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