Yannick Nézet-Séguin

The symphony, as we know it today, underwent major changes from the end of the 18th to the late 19th century. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, two symphonies from two composers in Vienna during that time illustrate the range of the form.
 


Hans van der Woerd

Hello Radio Friends! If you were unable to get a ticket for any of the sold-out Philadelphia Orchestra performances this past weekend of Mahler's Third Symphony, or to hear our live broadcast of yesterday's final concert, I strongly encourage you to listen to the re-broadcast tonight at 7 pm on WRTI HD-2, on the fabulous WRTI Mobile App, or our classical web stream at wrti.org.

Credit: Jonathan Tichler/Metropolitan Opera, 2017

Yannick Nézet-Séguin has been entering the Metropolitan Opera through the backstage artists' entrance for years, though now it’s different: He’s now among those who run the place. The Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns met him there prior to his April to May run of Wagner’s Flying Dutchman.

Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 4 is not very well known in America. But it has a strong connection with the Philadelphia Orchestra, which continues to mine the richness of the work. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.


This Sunday at 1 pm, it’s a memorable re-broadcast from 2014 of the fast-paced, one-act opera Salome. Among the most important musical works of the 20th century, it stands out for its revolutionary use of a large-scale orchestra and virtuosic singers, as much as for its graphic depiction of this deeply psychological tale. It's performed in a historic, joint production by the Philadelphia Orchestra and Opera Philadelphia.

Grammy Week on WRTI

Feb 16, 2017

The 2017 Grammys were awarded on Sunday, February 12th, and all week long WRTI plays the nominees and winners! You’ll get to hear the music, the performers, and the composers nominated in the many Classical and Jazz fields.

Dominic Mercier

Oscar Wilde’s late 19th-century play, retelling the biblical story of Salome, became the basis for Richard Strauss' one-act opera SALOME that premiered in Dresden in 1905. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the opera continues to shock and dazzle, nearly a century later.

WRTI's Mark Pinto fills us in on the latest classical music CDs on Saturdays after the opera on Classical New Releases. Check out five newly released recordings he recommends!

This Sunday's re-broadcast on WRTI features Yannick Nézet-Séguin on the podium for the final concert of The Philadelphia Orchestra’s 2015-16 season. He's joined by a Philadelphia favorite, the incomparable Lang Lang, performing the music of someone else whose career had close ties to Philadelphia, Sergei Rachmaninoff.

All three of the works on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast were composed in Paris within a five-year period (1928-33), one by a German, another by a Frenchman, and the last by an American. And they all marvelously combine elements of serious composition with popular influences, notably from jazz.


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