Yannick Nézet-Séguin

Richard Strauss’ Alpine Symphony is, on one level, a musical description of nature. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the accessible music belies a greater meaning.

Based on a boyhood experience getting caught in a storm hiking in the Alps, the idea for An Alpine Symphony germinated for years in Strauss’s mind.  It wasn’t until after Gustav Mahler died, that he determined to finish the work, which he regarded as a tribute to his fellow composer.

Join us for a Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast that recaptures a performance that took place in November, 2011, when Yannick Nezet-Seguin was music director designate of The Philadelphia Orchestra, and the chemistry between the musicians and Yannick was already much in evidence.

All of the works on the program have an Italian theme, and represent a kind of celebration of Italian literature, culture, and landscape.

Jan Regan

The Philadelphia Orchestra’s three-week swing through Germany, France, Holland and England left cheering audiences in its wake. Minutes before going onstage at London’s Royal Festival Hall for the final concert of the tour, Music Director Yannick Nezet-Seguin told the Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns what made him the happiest.

David Patrick Stearns: The Viennese were the toughest. The Londoners were the smartest. The Parisians were...well, Yannick Nezet-Seguin explained it best.

This spring's Philadelphia Orchestra tour destination isn't Beijing, but Berlin and nine other musical capitals of Europe. Between May 21st and June 6th, audiences will hear the level of music making that local listeners have known for three years under Yannick Nezet-Seguin. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns reports what is in store.

David Patrick Stearns: The biggest danger of the 2015 Philadelphia Orchestra tour of Europe is that the rest of the orchestra's year might seem like a letdown – to judge from Yannick Nezet-Seguin's state of elation.

It's Philadelphia Orchestra Day on WRTI!

May 7, 2015

You're in for a big treat today! We're designating a whole day of programming to our own Philadelphians - from 6 am to 6 pm. Throughout the day during classical hours, you'll hear Philadelphia Orchestra recordings under Music Directors Leopold Stokowski, Eugene Ormandy, Riccardo Muti, Wolfgang Sawallisch, Christoph Eschenbach, and Yannick Nezet-Seguin. 

Ken Howard

Join us on Saturday, April 11th for our weekly broadcast of the Metropolitan Opera - live from Lincoln Center. This week, it's Verdi's DON CARLO, with Yannick Nezet-Seguin on the podium.

Ferruccio Furlanetto first sang Philip with the Met in 2005, and then again in 2010 and 2013, and has portrayed the tormented monarch around the world. His other recent roles at the Met have included Silva in Verdi’s Ernani, and Jacopo Fiesco in Simon Boccanegra, which he will reprise at the Met next season.

One of the most loved and exciting works in the orchestral repertoire is The Planets by Gustav Holst. But, as WRTI’s Kile Smith reports, the way we hear it now is not the form in which audiences first heard it.

For such an immediately successful work, and for one that is central to the orchestral repertoire, The Planets by Gustav Holst took a long time to get off the ground.

Classical Guitarist Miloš's Aranjuez

Mar 7, 2015

At Crossover, we're lucky that so many great guests are willing to return to speak with us - and you! Montenegrin guitarist Miloš Karadaglić is one of them.

The Philadelphia Orchestra is hardly settling into a routine in its fourth season with Yannick Nezet-Seguin. Plans for 2015-2016 announced this week have the conductor going well beyond typical classical subscription concerts, plus engineering guest appearances that are bound to make national news. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns reports.

Radio Script:

While printed programs at classical music concerts are commonplace, The Philadelphia Orchestra continues to explore the use of mobile technology developed by Drexel University to inform the listening experience during the performance. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the LiveNote App will be used in three upcoming concerts.

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