Yannick Nézet-Séguin

WRTI's Mark Pinto fills us in on the latest classical music CDs on Saturdays after the opera on Classical New Releases. Check out five newly released recordings he recommends!

This Sunday's re-broadcast on WRTI features Yannick Nézet-Séguin on the podium for the final concert of The Philadelphia Orchestra’s 2015-16 season. He's joined by a Philadelphia favorite, the incomparable Lang Lang, performing the music of someone else whose career had close ties to Philadelphia, Sergei Rachmaninoff.

All three of the works on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast were composed in Paris within a five-year period (1928-33), one by a German, another by a Frenchman, and the last by an American. And they all marvelously combine elements of serious composition with popular influences, notably from jazz.


This week’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast brings us a performance from early March, which saw the return to Philadelphia of pianist Hélène Grimaud, who performs a concerto close to her heart, the Brahms Piano Concerto No. 2

Credit: Jessica Griffin/Philadelphia Orchestra

His Excellency President Elbegdorj — the leader of the growing democracy situated between China and Russia — spent last Friday, September 23rd in Philadelphia, following the conclusion of his work at the United Nations General Assembly in New York. 


Three richly orchestrated works on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast complete the series of concerts from last January celebrating the music of Vienna.

Vienna was a hotbed of musical evolution, and the second concert in the Philadelphia Orchestra’s three-part series of the Music of Vienna shows us how far the symphony traveled in that time. On Sunday, September 4th at 1 pm, Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Philadelphians bring you two symphonies composed about 80 years apart: Joseph Haydn’s 103rd, the famous “Drumroll” Symphony, and Anton Bruckner’s 4th.

Interested in Steve Jobs, Georgia O'Keefe or Alice in Wonderland? They are all explored in new music in the upcoming American concert season.

Credit Mathias Botho

Join us to hear the first concert in The Philadelphia Orchestra’s "Music of Vienna" series, recorded live last January at Verizon Hall. Pianist Jan Lisiecki, an audience favorite at only 20 years old, will be the soloist in Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4.

Mention the music of Vienna, and some of us automatically think of a waltz. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the city was a musical magnet for composers, especially from the late 18th century through the 19th and beyond.


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