Yannick Nézet-Séguin

Jan Regan/Philadelphia Orchestra

On the stage of China's National Centre for the Performing Arts in Beijing—just a month ago—Yannick Nézet-Séguin, stood before his Philadelphia Orchestra and spoke to an audience that included sponsors, patrons, musicians, diplomats, Chinese government officials and business leaders, as well as delegations from Philadelphia and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Join us for a re-broadcast of a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from 2016 that brings us two Philadelphia Orchestra commissions—Maurice Wright’s Resounding Drums, a timpani concerto composed for the Orchestra’s principal timpanist Don Liuzzi, and the Clarinet Concerto by Jonathan Leshnoff, composed for the principal clarinetist of the Philadelphians, Ricardo Morales.

Special rebroadcast! The Philadelphia Orchestra, in Asia this week, has been doing quite of bit of traveling on its own, and on Monday, June 5th at 7 pm on HD-2 and WRTI.org, WRTI will turn back the clock and rebroadcast this Vienna Festival concert, previously aired on March 20th of last year. It was a memorable performance, conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, of two symphonies composed roughly 80 years apart: Joseph Haydn’s 103rd, the famous “Drumroll” Symphony, and Anton Bruckner’s 4th.

The symphony, as we know it today, underwent major changes from the end of the 18th to the late 19th century. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, two symphonies from two composers in Vienna during that time illustrate the range of the form.
 


Hans van der Woerd

Hello Radio Friends! If you were unable to get a ticket for any of the sold-out Philadelphia Orchestra performances this past weekend of Mahler's Third Symphony, or to hear our live broadcast of yesterday's final concert, I strongly encourage you to listen to the re-broadcast tonight at 7 pm on WRTI HD-2, on the fabulous WRTI Mobile App, or our classical web stream at wrti.org.

This Sunday, April 30th on WRTI, Yannick Nézet-Séguin indulges his passion for opera, as our Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast brings to the airwaves Béla Bartók’s searing one-act opera Bluebeard’s Castle, and selections from Tchaikovsky's ballet, Swan Lake.

Credit: Jonathan Tichler/Metropolitan Opera, 2017

Yannick Nézet-Séguin has been entering the Metropolitan Opera through the backstage artists' entrance for years, though now it’s different: He’s now among those who run the place. The Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns met him there prior to his April to May run of Wagner’s Flying Dutchman.

Credit: Chris Lee

Join us on Easter Sunday to hear the Philadelphia Orchestra conclude its chronological survey of Brahms’ magisterial four symphonies with a performance of his Symphony No. 4, on WRTI’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast from 1 to 3 pm.

Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 4 is not very well known in America. But it has a strong connection with the Philadelphia Orchestra, which continues to mine the richness of the work. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.


It was in 1832 that the great virtuoso violinist Niccolò Paganini—also an extraordinary violist—became the proud new owner of a Stradivarius viola. Wanting to show it off, but frustrated by the lack of concertos featuring the instrument, he commissioned Hector Berlioz to write a work that would help him put his purchase on display.

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