Yannick Nézet-Séguin

Hans van der Woerd

A pairing of two choral works—one of them a world premiere—and Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition, in the famous Ravel orchestration, highlight this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on WRTI 90.1.

According to Middle Eastern legend, Scheherazade saved her own life by telling her husband, the Sultan,  folk tales for A Thousand and One Nights. Those stories-within a-story inspired 19th-century composer Rimsky-Korsakov to create an orchestral suite that remains one of his most popular works today. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

WRTI's Gregg Whiteside is once again traveling across the globe with The Philadelphia Orchestra—this year, on their tour of Israel and Europe with Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin. WRTI 90.1 will broadcast and stream four concerts from the tour with a one-hour delay.

Andrew Eccles

WRTI's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on Sunday, April 29th brings you the unfamiliar and the very familiar: a first-ever Philadelphia Orchestra performance of a violin concerto by the contemporary Dutch composer Michel van der Aa, and a work the Orchestra has performed as often as any in its history, the Symphony No. 2 by Rachmaninoff, conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin.

The New York Music Co., New York, 1908, monographic. Source: Library of Congress

Fans at baseball games across America have been singing the same song during the seventh-inning stretch for decades. If you're in the stands, nothing beats the fun of belting out that tune everyone knows, "Take Me Out to the Ballgame!"

Join us this Easter Sunday at 1 pm to hear a joyous concert broadcast of Handel's oratorio, Messiah, with a world-class roster of vocalists, a chorus of talented voices from throughout our region, and the musicians of The Philadelphia Orchestra, all conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin.

Although Handel’s Messiah is now regularly performed during the Christmas holidays, the work was actually premiered in the spring before Easter. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on the fantastically successful masterpiece, which was created by necessity in just 24 days over two centuries ago.


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