Yannick Nézet-Séguin

History will be made when The Philadelphia Orchestra kicks off its 2016 Asia Tour with two concerts at the Hong Kong Cultural Centre. And you'll be right there! WRTI's Gregg Whiteside is traveling across the globe to China to bring you both performances live, in real time, on WRTI. Tune in at 90.1 FM in Philadelphia, or listen online at WRTI.org.

Three richly orchestrated works on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast complete the series of concerts from January celebrating the music of Vienna.

Austrian composer Anton Webern became famous as a member of the "Second Viennese School," known for writing atonal music. But, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, an early work - officially premiered decades after Webern’s death - shows another side to the 20th-century modernist.


Join us this Easter Sunday at 1 pm to hear a Philadelphia Orchestra concert that actually kicked off the holiday season in grand style this past December. WRTI will broadcast a joyous performance of Handel's Messiah, with a world-class roster of vocalists, a chorus of talented voices from throughout our region, and the musicians of The Philadelphia Orchestra, all conducted by Yannick Nezet-Seguin.

Although Handel’s Messiah is now regularly performed during the Christmas holidays, the work was actually premiered in the spring before Easter. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on the fantastically successful masterpiece, which was created by necessity in just 24 days over two centuries ago.


Vienna was a hotbed of musical evolution, and the second concert in the Philadelphia Orchestra’s three-part series of the Music of Vienna shows us how far the symphony traveled in that time. On Sunday, March 20th at 1 pm Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Philadelphians bring two symphonies composed about 80 years apart: Joseph Haydn’s 103rd, the famous “Drumroll” Symphony, and Anton Bruckner’s 4th.

The symphony as we know it today underwent major changes from the end of the 18th to the late 19th century. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, two symphonies from two composers in Vienna during that time illustrate the range of the form.
 


It was on the 2nd of March, 100 years ago, that The Philadelphia Orchestra was, in effect, introduced to the world. The stage of the Academy of Music had to be extended, at considerable expense, to accommodate the enormous vocal and orchestral forces for the first United States performance of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 8, the so-called “Symphony of a Thousand.”

A thriving classical music world involves not only composers and performers, but those who listen, and those who manage, connect, and promote the artists and the art form. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on Musical America, a publication that has been celebrating and connecting classical musicians since 1898:


Mat Hennek

Quite a few classical composers have found artistic inspiration in one of the planet’s most important natural resources. WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports on pianist Helene Grimaud's new recording of a collection of works reflecting on...water.


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