WRTI Spotlight

Opera on WRTI
4:05 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

The Met Opera on WRTI: Puccini's MADAMA BUTTERFLY, Feb. 1st at 1 PM

This week, the Metropolitan Opera presents MADAMA BUTTERFLY, Giacomo Puccini's heartbreaking tale, in three acts, of innocence, betrayal, and sacrifice. Amanda Echalaz makes her Met debut as Cio-Cio-San. Rising tenor Bryan Hymel sings Pinkerton. Philippe Auguin conducts.

The original version of the opera, in two acts, had its premiere on February 17, 1904 at La Scala in Milan.

Madama Butterfly is a co-production of the Metropolitan Opera, English National Opera, and the Lithuanian National Opera. Saturday, February 1, 1 to 4:15 pm.

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The Fabulous Philadelphians on WRTI
3:10 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

The Philadelphians on WRTI: David Kim Plays Tchaikovsky, Cristian Macelaru Conducts, Feb. 2, 1 PM

hiladelphia Orchestra Associate Conductor Cristian Macelaru

Join us this Sunday at 1 pm for a Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast of a Verizon Hall performance first heard in mid-December, and offering two delightful pieces by Tchaikovsky that feature Concertmaster David Kim as soloist: the Serenade Melancholique, and Valse-Scherzo - both personally meaningful works to Mr. Kim, who was the only American awarded a prize at the 1986 quadrennial Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow.

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Pledge and Enter Contest on January 31
11:23 am
Thu January 30, 2014

WRTI Presents: Philadelphia Orchestra Day! Friday, January 31, 6 AM to 6 PM

Philadelphia Orchestra Day on WRTI is Friday, January 31, 6 am to 6 pm. Join us!

Listen today at 90.1 FM, or online here, as we celebrate our very own Fabulous Philadelphians with 12 hours of their finest performances conducted by Music Director Yannick Nezet-Seguin, as well as legacy recordings of legendary conductors including Riccardo Muti, Wolfgang Sawallisch, and Eugene Ormandy. Some of your favorite orchestra musicians will say hello!

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
5:58 am
Wed January 29, 2014

Mexico and Cuba in the Fleisher Collection

Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday Feb. 1st at 5 pm... The Fleisher Collection of Orchestral Music is not only the world’s largest lending library of orchestral performance materials, but because of the foresight of founder Edwin Fleisher, Curator Arthur Cohn, and the adventurousness of the globe-trotting Nicolas Slonimsky, it also contains hundreds and hundreds of Latin American orchestral scores and parts.

As we’ve recounted on Discoveries before, Fleisher commissioned conductor and author Slonimsky in 1941 to travel throughout Central and South America for the purpose of adding music from these countries to the vast European and growing American repertoire already on the shelves of the Collection. Scores were shipped to the Free Library of Philadelphia, and the huge task of reproducing them began. Some of the scores were given outright as gifts; others, after photographic reproduction, were returned. Dozens of music copyists then began extracting the individual parts needed so that the works could be performed.

This would have been familiar work for Candelaria Huizar, the composer, violist, hornist, and in the 1920s, music copyist in the library of the National Conservatory in Mexico City. He had already studied music as a child with the director of the Jérez Municipal Band. At nine the band took him on as a saxhorn player. He joined other brass bands, and when one of them traveled to Mexico City, he stayed there the rest of his life. He became a music copyist at the Conservatory, then librarian, and later, Huizar was professor of composition, harmony, and orchestration there. His Imágenes (Images) is a delightful look back at his hometown.

Joining him at the Conservatory was his countryman José Rolón. He studied music in Paris from 1904 to 1907, then came back to Mexico, and founded a music school in Guadalajara. In 1927 he returned to Paris to study with composer Paul Dukas and one of the great composition teachers of the 20th century, Nadia Boulanger. Rolón came back to Mexico again, taught at the National Conservatory, wrote music criticism and a harmony textbook, and composed the Piano Concerto we’ll hear today. This brand-new recording was made from materials housed in the Fleisher Collection.

Born in Paris to a Cuban mother and Spanish father, Amadeo Roldán, after music study in Madrid, moved to Cuba at age 19. He was concertmaster of the Havana Philharmonic, founded the Havana String Quartet, and became one of Cuba’s leading composers. Roldán broke new ground with perhaps the very first percussion-only works for the concert stage, and injected new life into Western classical music with the sounds and rhythms of Afrocubanismo. His 1928 ballet La Rebambaramba, the Suite of which we’ll listen to, is a riot of percussion, soaring melody, and audacious orchestral sound.

When Mr. Cohn suggested to Mr. Fleisher that his Collection needed to look beyond the standard repertoire and acquire symphonic works from other cultures, this is what he was talking about.

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Jazz Hot 11 Countdown
11:55 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

Jazz Hot 11 Countdown: January 27, 2014

WRTI's Jazz Hot 11 is a weekly countdown of your favorite new jazz releases in rotation.  
This week's Hot 11:  
1. Lili Anel - Something To Do - I CAN SEE BLISS FROM HERE  

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The Metropolitan Opera on WRTI
5:37 pm
Fri January 24, 2014

Netrebko and Vargas in Donizetti's The Elixir of Love: The Met Opera on WRTI, Jan. 25, 1 PM

Soprano sings Adina in Donizetti's L'ELISIR D'AMORE.

Soprano Anna Netrebko reprises her adorable Adina in this charming production of Gaetano Donizetti’s tender comedy. Acclaimed tenor Ramón Vargas is the love-struck Nemorino, and Erwin Schrott sings the likeable quack Dulcamara, whose "magic" potion causes as many problems as it solves, and maps the destiny of a love triangle involving a lovable bumpkin, a dashing sergeant, and a bewitching town flirt.

L'Elisir d'Amore (The Elixir of Love) includes the heartbreaking aria "Una furtiva lagrima."

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Latest from ICON Magazine
2:11 pm
Fri January 24, 2014

ICON: The Jazz Scene

ORGAN-IZING: In keeping with Philadelphia’s contribution to jazz through the years, it must be mentioned that the city and surrounding areas are also known for producing some of the finest jazz organ players in history. The most famous of them all, Jimmy Smith, was born in Norristown. Joey DeFrancesco, a native Philadelphian, helped put the Hammond B-3 organ back on the map. And who can forget area natives like Richard “Groove” Holmes and Trudy Pitts? Organist Dan Fogel has been at it for a long time, despite trends and ups and downs in jazz organ popularity.

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Jazz Hot 11 Countdown
8:44 am
Tue January 21, 2014

Hot 11 Jazz Countdown: January 20, 2014

WRTI's Jazz Hot 11 is a weekly countdown of your favorite new jazz releases in rotation.  
This week's Hot 11:  
1. Lili Anel - Something To Do - I CAN SEE BLISS FROM HERE  

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6:46 am
Mon January 20, 2014

Conductor Claudio Abbado Dies at 80

Lead in text: 
Claudio Abbado, a conductor whose refined interpretations of a large symphonic and operatic repertory won him the directorships of several of the world’s most revered musical institutions — including La Scala, the London Symphony Orchestra, the Vienna Philharmonic, the Vienna State Opera and the Berlin Philharmonic — died on Monday. He was 80.
  • Source: Nytimes
  • | Via: The New York Times
Claudio Abbado, a conductor whose refined interpretations of a large symphonic and operatic repertory won him the directorships of several of the world's most revered musical institutions - including La Scala, the London Symphony Orchestra, the Vienna Philharmonic, the Vienna State Opera and the Berlin Philharmonic - died on Monday.
Live from the Philadelphia Museum of Art
2:36 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

Live from Art After 5 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art: January 17 at 6 PM

Join WRTI’s Jeff Duperon as he broadcasts live from Art After 5 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, tonight starting at 6 pm. The featured performers at the museum are the East Gipsy Band, respected jazz and gypsy musicians from the Hungarian music scene. Integrating traditional Roma music with improvisation and jazz, their music features well-known French, German, Italian, Hungarian, and Roma tunes. Jazz saxophonist and keyboardist Tim Ries performs on their debut album, released in May 2011.

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