WRTI Picks from NPR Music

Titanic: Voyage To The Past
10:46 pm
Thu April 19, 2012

Remembering The Titanic's Intrepid Bandleader

Portraits of Wallace Hartley (top center) and the other musicians aboard the Titanic, published after the ship sank in 1912.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Fri April 13, 2012 5:17 am

This weekend marks the centennial of the Titanic disaster. One hundred years ago Saturday, the ship that, as legend had it, "God himself couldn't sink," struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic. It was about 20 minutes to midnight on April 14, 1912. Two hours and 40 minutes later, the Titanic was gone.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:37 pm
Thu April 19, 2012

Around The Classical Internet: April 13, 2012

'60 Minutes' recently traveled to the Democratic Republic of Congo to talk to the musicians of the Orchestre Symphonique Kimbanguiste — the Kinshasa Symphony.
courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Fri April 13, 2012 5:10 pm

  • Remember the video we had last month of the incredibly inspiring orchestra in Kinshasa? 60 Minutes also got hep to them and went to the Democratic Republic of Congo to do a report.
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A Blog Supreme
10:23 pm
Wed April 18, 2012

Why Tax Day Is Even Worse For Musicians

The contradictions between art and business are set into relief by the U.S. income tax code.
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:05 pm

Tomorrow is the income tax filing deadline in the U.S., and jazz musicians in particular know it. The overwhelming majority of jazz musicians are freelance performers (and often freelance teachers, composers and other music-related service providers). But the informal aesthetics of the jazz world often extend to its business practices as well, with its handshake deals and cash payments. That makes it quite difficult to keep track of income and expenses when it comes time to report to the Internal Revenue Service.

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Holocaust Remembrance Day is April 19th
8:24 pm
Sun April 15, 2012

VIOLINS OF HOPE: Instruments From The Holocaust

Amnon Weinstein prepares a violin from the Holocaust for exhibit. He began restoring the violins in 1996 and now has 30 of them to display in an exhibit called Violins of Hope.
Nancy Pierce

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 10:28 am

Amnon Weinstein first encountered a violin from the Holocaust 50 years ago. He was a young violin maker in Israel, and a customer brought him an old instrument in terrible condition and wanted it restored.

The customer had played on the violin on the way to the gas chamber, but he survived because the Germans needed him for their death camp orchestra. He hadn't played on it since.

"So I opened the violin, and there inside there [were] ashes," Weinstein says.

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Music Education
1:29 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

Music Education In Public Schools Gets A Passing Grade

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 4:00 pm

Numbers — they always look so solid, so reassuring, so — dare I say — hopeful? Earlier this week, the U.S. Department of Education issued a new report titled Arts Education In Public Elementary and Secondary Schools, 1999-2000 and 2009-10.

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Jazz Album and Feature
1:16 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

Wes Montgomery: Early Recordings By A Late Guitar Great

The new compilation Echoes of Indiana Avenue collects rare early recordings by jazz guitarist Wes Montgomery.
Duncan Schiedt

Originally published on Sun March 25, 2012 6:07 am

When legendary jazz guitarist Wes Montgomery died in 1968, the list of his recordings filled an entire page — single-spaced. Now, more space is needed, because a significant new collection of previously unreleased Wes Montgomery music is out this month on a new compilation, Echoes of Indiana Avenue.

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New Classical Albums
12:54 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

From Hyperpianos To Harmonious Handel: New Classical Albums

Lisa Smirnova studied Handel's suites for five years before recording them.
ECM

Originally published on Sun February 12, 2012 12:51 pm

What's the saying — the more things change, the more they stay the same? It seems that's how it goes in the ways we make music. MIT futurologist Tod Machover rethinks traditional instruments, coming up with new things like the hyperpiano; Pianist Michael Chertock gives it a go in an explosive excerpt below.

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Jazz Headlines
12:47 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

Around The Jazz Internet: April 6, 2012

Detail from the cover of BBNG2, the new mixtape from controversial Toronto trio BADBADNOTGOOD.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 6:54 pm

Poll: does this look like Duke Ellington or not? How about this? Washington D.C. wants to know.

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Classical Headlines
12:41 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

Around The Classical Internet: April 6, 2012

Not a new Food Network show: tenor Jay Hunter Morris, as Siegfried forging his sword, in the Metropolitan Opera's controversial Ring cycle.
Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 5:08 pm

  • New York's Metropolitan Opera is gearing up to launch Wagner's complete Ring cycle, but just how "revolutionary" is the $16 million, 45-ton production? New York Times' Anthony Tommasini talks with Met GM Peter Gelb about the embattled Robert Le Page production, a conversation Parterre Box views as "damage control" on Gelb's part.
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Deceptive Cadence
1:12 pm
Thu March 22, 2012

Stick Your Head Into A High Performance Harpsichord

Andreas Staier plays Bach's Goldberg Variations on a copy of this famously grand harpsichord built in 1734 by Hieronymus Albrecht Hass currently housed in Hamburg, Germany.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Thu March 22, 2012 9:32 am

All week, we're exploring J.S. Bach's Goldberg Variations.

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