WRTI Picks from NPR Music

Music Interviews
5:28 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

Eddie Palmieri: Now A True 'Jazz Master'

Eddie Palmieri
Raymond Roig AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 20, 2012 11:55 am

Pianist Eddie Palmieri has been given many nicknames. He's been called The Latin Monk because of his Thelonious Monk-inspired dissonances. He's been called The Piano Breaker Man, because he hits the keys so hard. He's even been called the 'madman of Latin music.' He's taken many of the innovations of modern jazz pianists and brought them into his Latin bands. But he's never stopped playing good dance music.

In 1994, Palmieri's lobbying culminated in the announcement of a new Grammy Award category for Afro-Caribbean Jazz.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:02 pm
Sat July 21, 2012

A Musician And The Audition Of His Life

To audition for the BSO, percussionist Mike Tetreault was required to prepare musical excerpts from 50 pieces on nine different instruments, including timpani.
Sean Hagwell Mike Tetreault

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:18 pm

Earlier this year, classical percussionist Mike Tetreault walked onstage at Symphony Hall in Boston for the audition of a lifetime: The Boston Symphony Orchestra was looking for not just one but two new percussionists.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:49 pm
Fri July 20, 2012

Around The Classical Internet: July 20, 2012

"Sonochromatic cyborg" and artist Neil Harbisson — with the implanted device that converts color to sound — at his TED talk in Edinburgh last month.
James Duncan Davidson courtesy of TED

Originally published on Fri July 20, 2012 5:58 pm

  • Remember the interview with "sonochromatic artist cyborg" Neil Harbisson? He was born without the ability to see any colors at all, but his prosthetic eyepiece translates color into sound — and he has started reinterpreting music visually through his new perceptions of color, as in his painting based on Mozart's "Queen of the Night" aria.
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Mom And Dad's Record Collection
5:12 pm
Thu July 19, 2012

At Home With The Coltranes, Listening To Stravinsky

Saxophonist Ravi Coltrane is the son of jazz icons John and Alice Coltrane. His new album Spirit Fiction was released June 19.
Deborah Feingold Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri July 20, 2012 8:45 pm

Today, All Things Considered continues its Mom and Dad's Record Collection series with a musician who is a heir of American musical royalty.

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A Blog Supreme from NPR
3:55 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Back Home With Canada's Greatest Living Jazz Musician

Oliver Jones.
Michael Slobodian

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:15 pm

A week ago, Oliver Jones — the greatest living jazz musician in Canada — played his hometown Montreal International Jazz Festival, one of the world's largest. "Oliver Jones Plays Oliver Jones," read the bill. It was the first time, he said in a conversation earlier last week, that the pianist, now 77, would be playing strictly his own tunes for an entire set.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:23 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Music Around the Country: Classical Summer Festivals 2012

Music and food mix well on the lawn of the Ravinia Festival outside Chicago. This year's edition runs through Sept. 9.
Ravinia Festival

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 6:17 pm

With the July Fourth holiday behind us, now is the time to map out a musical adventure. Below is a sampling of just a few of the dozens of summer classical music festivals around the country, grouped by region. From outdoor extravaganzas and picturesque locales to intimate indoor settings, live music thrives in the summertime. Been to a good summer fest not listed here? Tell us all about it.

EAST

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Flash Choir Video!
4:39 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

A Flash Choir Sings Philip Glass in Times Square

Conductor Kent Tritle leads an impromptu choir in the world premiere of Philip Glass' "A New Rule" in New York's Times Square.

Watch a "flash choir" descend upon Times Square to sing a world premiere of music by Philip Glass, commissioned by NPR Music in honor of the composer's 75th birthday. Watch and listen here.

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Music Reviews
11:51 am
Tue July 10, 2012

'St. Matthew Passion': A Monumental Bach Feast

Johann Sebastian Bach wrote the St. Matthew Passion in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra.
Getty Digital

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 12:25 pm

Facing Bach's St. Matthew Passion, I often feel a combination of anticipation and dread. It's a great work, profound in its humanity and spirituality, with sublimely beautiful music. But it's a long haul, and if it's not a good performance, well, I'm stuck. And it can be not-good in various ways: either too solemnly pious or too much an exercise in musical style rather than emotional drama. A new DVD recorded in 2010 at Berlin's great concert hall, the Philharmonie, would be of major interest under any circumstances.

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NPR's Song Travels
1:37 pm
Mon July 9, 2012

Listen: Pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet on NPR

Jean-Yves Thibaudet

French pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet is one of the leading performers on today's classical-music scene. He has more than 40 albums to his credit, including interpretations of the classical repertoire, as well as music by George Gershwin, Duke Ellington and Bill Evans.

Music Interviews
5:00 pm
Sun July 8, 2012

'Initial Here': Jazz Musician Linda Oh Plays Out Her Heritage

Linda Oh's latest album, Initial Here, was released May 22.
Vincent Soyez Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun July 8, 2012 5:48 pm

Jazz bassist and bandleader Linda Oh says her new album, Initial Here, is an exploration of her heritage. She was born in Malaysia to Chinese parents, but as a toddler, she moved with her family to Australia.

Oh started taking piano lessons there when she was 4. Music was just a hobby back then, but once her uncle strapped a bass guitar around her neck, that's when she fell in love.

Oh cut her teeth playing bass in both jazz and rock bands all over her hometown of Perth in Western Australia.

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