WRTI Picks from NPR Music

WRTI Picks from NPR Music
12:29 pm
Sun February 22, 2015

Clark Terry, Ebullient Jazz Trumpeter, Has Died

Clark Terry wasn't just a trumpeter with flawless technique; he was also, according to one peer, a "natural-born educator" who devoted much of his later career to passing on his immense musical knowledge.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun February 22, 2015 7:22 pm

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
5:35 pm
Sun February 8, 2015

Bird Of A Feather: Rudresh Mahanthappa On Learning From Charlie Parker

Rudresh Mahanthappa's latest album is Bird Calls.
Jimmy Katz Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon February 9, 2015 9:53 am

In the early 1980s, when a young sixth-grader in Colorado first heard Charlie Parker, his life was transformed. Now a world-class saxophonist, Rudresh Mahanthappa is paying homage to Parker with his new album, Bird Calls. Mahanthappa says it's a tribute to Charlie Parker — but there are no Charlie Parker songs here.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
5:47 am
Sat February 7, 2015

The Cold Wrath Of Nature, Given Operatic Voice

Kevin Burdette stars in Everest as Beck Weathers, a Dallas doctor who survived a deadly blizzard on the mountain in 1996.
Karen Almond The Dallas Opera

Originally published on Sat February 7, 2015 11:48 am

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
12:33 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Latin Symphony: How Classical Music Saved Dinorah Marquez's Life

Young members of the Latino Arts: Strings program.
Courtesy of the artist

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Listen to Opolais in La Boheme, Jan. 24, 1 PM
1:10 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Two Leads, Two Deaths In 18 Hours

Kristine Opolais made her Madama Butterfly debut as Cio-Cio-San, only to get a last-minute call to play Mimi in La Boheme.
Marty Sohl Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Over the weekend, soprano Kristine Opolais sang her heart out — and died twice.

Friday evening she had sung the lead in Puccini's Madama Butterfly. It was her debut in that role at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. It was a big deal. Opolais was so excited about it that she stayed up until five the next morning.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
3:41 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

What We Love And Hate About 'Mozart In The Jungle'

Gael García Bernal (right), Bernadette Peters and Malcolm McDowell star in the classical music comedy series Mozart in the Jungle.
Nicole Rivelli Amazon Studios

Pill popping, pot smoking, back-stabbing, bed hopping and tantrum throwing — now we're talking classical music! At least that's what the new Amazon series Mozart in the Jungle would have us believe is all in a day's work for orchestra musicians. The 10-part series is based on a tell-all book of the same name published a decade ago by oboist Blair Tindall.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
3:22 pm
Wed January 14, 2015

'Everything Is Cyclical': Christian McBride Looks At 2015 In Jazz

Christian McBride is the host of NPR's Jazz Night In America.
Anna Webber Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 5:55 pm

Christian McBride likely doesn't need much of an introduction. He's a bassist who's worked with everyone from McCoy Tyner to Diana Krall to Paul McCartney.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
8:35 am
Fri January 9, 2015

Swan Songs: Classical Musicians We Lost In 2014

Conductor Claudio Abbado was one of the many great classical musicians we bid farewell to in 2014.
Getty Images

Farewells are never easy, especially when you're saying goodbye to a favorite musician. From conductors and composers to pianists, singers and critics, the classical music world lost many masterful musicians in 2014.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
4:50 pm
Wed December 31, 2014

Ahmad Jamal, 'A Musical Architect Of The Highest Order,' Keeps On Building

At 84, acclaimed jazz pianist Ahmad Jamal is still recording and touring
Karen Michel

Originally published on Wed December 31, 2014 6:48 pm

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
6:01 pm
Sat December 27, 2014

John McNeil, A Trumpeter Robbed Of His Breath, Blows Again

Trumpeter John McNeil rejoins Hush Point, a group of friends from New York's jazz scene, on the new album Blues and Reds. Left to right: Jeremy Udden, Anthony Pinciotti, Aryeh Kobrinsky, John McNeil.
Alex Hollock Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed December 31, 2014 10:41 am

John McNeil may be the most important trumpet player you've never heard of.

Many aspiring musicians know him as an educator, through his many instructional books like The Art of Jazz Trumpet. But getting to know McNeil as a performer or recording artist hasn't always been easy: his records could be tough to find.

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