WRTI Picks from NPR Music

WRTI Picks from NPR Music
12:28 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Huberman's List: How A Violinist Saved Jewish Musicians In World War II

Violinist Bronislaw Huberman in a 1900 photo, taken when he was 18 years old.
Augustus Rischgitz Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 12:25 pm

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
3:28 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Singing The Praises Of Pre-Dawn Walks

Jazz composer Maria Schneider (left) and soprano Dawn Upshaw collaborated on the new album Winter Morning Walks.
Jimmy & Dena Katz Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

Minnesota-born composer Maria Schneider has called New York home for more than 30 years, and she knows how to find nature in the middle of the city. Because her new album is called Winter Morning Walks, we walked to her favorite bird-watching spot in Central Park on a chilly February morning.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
1:36 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

Beyond 'Dayenu': What's Your Music Of Liberation?

An engraving of Moses crossing the Red Sea by 19th-century German artist Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 7:04 am

Tonight marks the first night of Passover, the commemoration of the Jews' liberation from slavery. Like millions around the world, I'll be sitting down to Seder to celebrate, in my case with a completely religiously and culturally mixed-up mishpocheh. I'm not Jewish, but Passover is one of my favorite nights of the year. With all of its rituals, this holiday takes eating mindfully to a whole new and incredible level, with every foodstuff, prayer and movement geared towards revisiting and renewing the ancient story of bitterness and then emancipation.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
6:36 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

Remembering Risë Stevens, A Star Of Opera And Pop Culture

The late American mezzo-soprano Risë Stevens in her signature role as Carmen.
Courtesy of the Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:59 am

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
3:52 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Pope Francis I: An Opera Lover!

The newly elected Pope Francis (formerly known as opera lover and Argentine Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio) appears on the balcony of St Peter's Basilica on March 13, 2013 in Vatican City.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 10:38 am

Here's a quick side note to today's big news ...

Immediately after the announcement of the papal election result and the name the new pope had chosen, Brian Williams of NBC News asked New York's Cardinal Edward Egan about the new pontiff, Francis.

"Your Eminence?" Williams said.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
4:30 pm
Wed March 6, 2013

Britain's Brass Bands: A Working-Class Tradition On The Wane

Cornetist Adam Rosbottom rehearses with the Grimethorpe Colliery Band in January. The band was founded in South Yorkshire, England, in 1917.
Christopher Werth

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 11:49 am

The world often feels full of fading traditions, from drive-in movie theaters to the dying art of good old-fashioned letter writing.

For the British, add brass bands to that list. Traditional brass bands have played an important cultural role in working-class British communities for centuries. But some warn that without funding, they could become a thing of the past.

Take the Grimethorpe Colliery Band in South Yorkshire. The band was originally formed in 1917, and nearly 100 years later, a group of tuba, euphonium and other horn players still bears the band's name.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
3:22 pm
Fri March 1, 2013

Marches Madness: John Philip Sousa's 'Washington Post'

Circa 1910: A program advertising John Philip Sousa and his band.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 3:25 pm

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
8:03 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Benedict And Beethoven: The Outgoing Pope's Musical Life

Pope Benedict XVI addresses the audience at Milan's La Scala opera house where he heard a performance of Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 conducted by Daniel Barenboim.
Daniel Dal Zennaro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 9:18 am

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
12:27 pm
Mon February 25, 2013

Remembering Wolfgang Sawallisch, A Conductor Who Blossomed In Philadelphia

The late conductor Wolfgang Sawallisch, captured in rehearsals for a recording of Wagner's Die Meistersinger.
Vivianne Purdom courtesy of EMI Classics

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 11:30 am

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
7:03 am
Sat February 23, 2013

Music, The Food Of 'Amour'

Emmanuelle Riva in Michael Haneke's Amour.
Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sat February 23, 2013 11:31 am

Film scores are, by and large, manipulative. They do their work at the periphery of the senses, signaling danger, heralding victory, prodding us toward fear and joy in time with the unfolding story. Crucially, they are also empathic, letting us in on what the actors' words or faces may not convey. And when things get unpleasant, the score can step in as an emotional buffer — a layer of unreality between us and the action that lets us know we're safe. Sunday night at the Oscars, Hollywood will honor a film whose music manages to get all these things right.

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