Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

A glorious work infrequently heard in the concert hall will grace the airwaves this Sunday, November 27th at 1 pm, as the Philadelphia Orchestra, soloists, and the Westminster Symphonic Choir perform Mozart's Great Mass in C minor at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall. Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts.

Credit: Joseph Lange

Mozart mentioned in a letter to his father that he wanted to write a mass for his new wife Constanze, who was a soprano. “But there was no commission,” says Temple University music history professor Steven Zohn. “It’s not usual for him to write something on spec or just because he wanted to write something that showed the love for his wife.”

Ricardo Morales solos in the Mozart Clarinet Concerto, and Ching-Yun Hu is the pianist in the world premiere of Red Cliff in this month’s broadcast concert by the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, Sunday at 5 pm on WRTI.

What are you doing for the next 10 days? That's how long it would take, without sleep, to listen to the new Mozart edition. The mammoth set, which some are touting as the biggest box set ever, claims to hold every note of Mozart's music and then some.

This Sunday’s broadcast concert by the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia contains two works from this past Monday’s season opener: Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23 and Haydn’s Symphony No. 99. The soloist in the Mozart is the Taiwanese-American pianist Ching-Yun Hu.

Credit: Richard Holt

WRTI remembers Sir Neville Marriner with an entire Saturday morning of his recordings, October 15th, 6 am to noon. The prolific and revered conductor passed away October 2nd in London at age 92.

CAMILE SCHELSTRAETE

Conductor, harpsichordist, and early music specialist Ton Koopman conducts The Philadelphia Orchestra in this Sunday’s re-broadcast at 1 pm. It's a Verizon Hall concert from this past March, during which Koopman teams with his wife, harpsichordist Tini Mathot, in a performance of C.P.E. Bach’s Concerto for Two Harpsichords, a boldly experimental work by a composer well-known for his innovation and dynamism.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) didn't play the flute, and once suggested he didn't even like it. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, he went on to write music that makes the instrument sing...and dance!


Does a song, or even a symphony, trigger memories of important moments and milestones in your life? For violinist Hillary Hahn, a little-known, 19th-century concerto is an important part of her history and her current repertoire.


We're kicking off the Lyric Opera of Chicago's nine-week broadcast season on Saturday, May 14th from 1 to 5 pm with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's opera buffa The Marriage of Figaro, composed in 1786. Join us as the resourceful Figaro gets ready to marry his lovely Susanna – and endeavors to get his fiancée to the altar with her virtue still intact!

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