Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

A glorious work, infrequently heard in the concert hall, will grace the airwaves this Sunday, July 23rd at 1 pm, as the Philadelphia Orchestra, soloists, and the Westminster Symphonic Choir perform Mozart's Great Mass in C minor at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall. Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts.

Credit: Joseph Lange

Mozart mentioned in a letter to his father that he wanted to write a mass for his new wife Constanze, who was a soprano. “But there was no commission,” says Temple University music history professor Steven Zohn. “It’s not usual for him to write something on spec or just because he wanted to write something that showed the love for his wife.”

He's selfish. He's arrogant. He’s dangerous. With a list of conquests as long as the phonebook, Don Giovanni travels the world, snaring princesses and peasant girls alike. Thousands succumb, leaving a path of dishonor and broken lives. When the Don forces himself on the virtuous Donna Anna, her father intervenes and loses his life. Has the Don finally gone too far?

Youth and springtime are on dazzling display in this Symphony in C concert broadcast, Sunday from 4 to 6 pm on WRTI with music by Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Schubert, and Respighi.

Jessica Griffin

Hollywood may have typecast the bassoon as comedic star, but Philadelphia Orchestra Principal Bassoon Daniel Matsukawa fills us in on the instrument’s great lyrical expressiveness. WRTI's Susan Lewis has the story.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Credit: By Anonymous, possibly by Pietro Antonio Lorenzoni (1721-1782) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

WRTI's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast this Sunday, February 26, from 1 to 3 pm, celebrates Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart—the prodigy, and the master, with performances of his First Symphony, written at age eight, and his final one, the 41st Symphony​, composed a quarter century later.

We’re skipping all the way to No. 2 today for a special birthday celebration of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791). That’s right, you voted the wunderkind from Salzburg your No. 2 most essential classical composer. His symphonies, operas, concertos, and compositions, in every genre of the time, remain to this day an incredible marvel of genius.

Ricardo Morales solos in the Mozart Clarinet Concerto, and Ching-Yun Hu is the pianist in the world premiere of Red Cliff in this month’s broadcast concert by the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, Sunday at 5 pm on WRTI.

This Sunday’s broadcast concert by the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia contains two works from this past Monday’s season opener: Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23 and Haydn’s Symphony No. 99. The soloist in the Mozart is the Taiwanese-American pianist Ching-Yun Hu.

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