Vladimir Jurowski

Adrian Siegel Collection/Philadelphia Orchestra Association Archives

It was 88 years ago - on March 18, 1927 - that The Philadelphia Orchestra played the first performance of Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 4 at the Academy of Music. The composer revised the concerto in 1928. And, in 1941, The Philadelphians premiered yet another revised version - the final one.

As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the strong bond between The Philadelphia Orchestra and the Russian composer, pianist, and conductor was forged through this and other works.

Radio script:

This Sunday's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on WRTI 90.1 FM, led by Russian conductor Vladimir Jurowski, brings us two works by J.S. Bach, performed at Verizon Hall this past February, that give us a taste of the Baroque equivalents of the symphony and the concerto - the Orchestral Suite No. 2, and the Keyboard Concerto No. 1, more modest in size, but no less ambitious in vision.

In recent years, J. S. Bach's music has been embraced by period performers, and played less frequently by big symphony orchestras. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, The Philadelphia Orchestra takes a very modern - yet historical - approach to his music in WRTI's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on Sunday, February 22 at 1 pm.

The broadcast also features Bach’s Piano Concerto No. 1, and music of Strauss and Mahler.

Guest Conductor Vladimir Jurowski, a familiar presence on the podium here in Philadelphia, returned for a visit to Verizon Hall in late October, for a concert we hear broadcast on Sunday that continues three programming themes heard throughout this season: the 40/40 Project, the presentation of pieces that have not been performed on subscriptions concerts in at least the past 40 years, or ever; a month-long celebration of the “Art of the Pipe Organ,” featuring Verizon Hall’s majestic Fred J.

Think of the rising of the sun...for the first time ever. Russian Conductor Vladimir Jurowski says it's an ingenious beginning to the tone poem Also sprach Zarathustra by German composer Richard Strauss, based on philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche's novel of the same name. 

Music from the popular symphonic piece played a memorable role in the 1968 Hollywood film, 2001: A Space Odyssey. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, those famous opening bars are only the beginning of a work that continues to engage and intrigue audiences.

WRTI's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on Sunday, April 6 at 1 pm features several works of a celebrated Russian composer, conductor and pianist who had a close relationship with the ensemble. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the concert will be led by someone with connections of his own to the music and the man.

Join us for an all-Rachmaninoff program this Sunday at 1 pm, on the radio at 90.1 FM and around the world at wrti.org. The Philadelphians perform Rachmaninoff’s choral-symphonic setting of Edgar Allan Poe’s haunting poem, The Bells, which received its U.S. premiere here in Philadelphia in 1920 with Leopold Stokowski conducting.

Jim Cotter speaks with Maestro Vladimir Jurowski. He conducts the Philadelphia Orchestra in concerts at the Kimmel Center during the week of March 22, 2010.

Susan Lewis looks at the Philadelphia Theater Company's new one-woman show about the late political columnist, Molly Ivins. Red Hot Patriot stars Kathleen Turner, and opens on March 19th at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre.

Vladimir Jurowski, conductor

Feb 10, 2007

A conversation with conductor Vladimir Jurowski. Jason Peifer: Masonic Temple of Philadelphia--one of Philadelphia's architectural gems. Susan Lewis: Opera Company of Philadelphia, Porgy and Bess.