Stradivarius

WRTI Picks from NPR Music
3:15 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Is A Stradivarius Just A Violin?

A Stradivarius violin at the restoration and research laboratory of the Musee de la Musique, Paris, in 2009.
Patrick Kovarik AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 8:00 pm

The Stradivarius violin gets its name from master craftsman Antonio Stradivari. When he died in 1737, his secrets died with him: No one has ever been able to duplicate the sound of the violins or violas he made.

His instruments have taken on a mythical quality. Today they fetch millions of dollars at auctions; Sotheby's will soon auction off a viola that it expects to sell for $45 million.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
7:23 am
Sun February 9, 2014

Stolen Stradivarius Found By Milwaukee Police

A Stradivarius violin is pictured in December 2009 at the restoration and research laboratory of the Musee de la Musique in Paris.
Patrick Kovarik AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 11:26 am

Police in Milwaukee have recovered "Lipinski" – a 300-year-old Stradivarius stolen last month from a concertmaster as he was walking to his car with the rare violin.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, quoting law enforcement officials, says the instrument has been found:

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Creatively Speaking
6:33 am
Mon July 22, 2013

The Strad: Great Or Just Very Good?

Gil Shaham plays the 1699 “Countess Polignac” Stradivarius.

Nearly 300 years after the death of Antonio Stadivarius, the classical music world is paying up more and more millions for his violins.  And audiences attend concerts advertised more for their instruments than those playing them.

The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns asks: should fiddles be calling the tunes?