Simon Rattle

The venerable Berlin Philharmonic isn't known for impetuous courtships. But after conducting only three programs, the darkest of horses - Kirill Petrenko - was invited last week to succeed Simon Rattle as the Orchestra's chief conductor. Can the Berlin Philharmonic survive without its usual star power? The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns reports.

Join us this Sunday, May 31 at 4 pm as WRTI brings you the first in a series of broadcasts recorded live in concert at Carnegie Hall during the 2014/2015 season.

Re-live the opening night gala concert by the Berlin Philharmonic, led by Simon Rattle. Violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter – a longtime collaborator with the Philharmonic – is the soloist in the lush Bruch Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor. The program opens with Rachmaninoff's Symphonic Dances and concludes with the final moments of Stravinsky's The Firebird.

There’s big news in the classical music world. The London Symphony Orchestra announced on Tuesday, March 3, 2015 that Simon Rattle will become its music director in September of 2017. Rattle, chief conductor and artistic director of the Berlin Philharmonic since 2002, had previously announced that he would step down from that position when his contract expires in 2018.

Rattle’s relationship with the London Symphony Orchestra goes back to 1977, when he first appeared with the ensemble at the age of 22.  As its artistic leader, he’ll  succeed Valerie Gergiev who has been principal conductor since 2007. More information from the LSO's website.

WRTI's Susan Lewis has more on this much sought-after international conductor, who has a bond with our own Philadelphia Orchestra nurtured over the last 20 years.

There’s breaking news in the classical music world. The London Symphony Orchestra announced this morning that Simon Rattle will become its music director in September of 2017.  Rattle, chief conductor and artistic director of the Berlin Philharmonic since 2002, had previously announced that he would step down from that position when his contract expires in 2018.

Can't make it to NYC tonight to hear the Carnegie Hall Opening Night Gala performance? No problem! You'll be there with WRTI. Right here on WRTI.org, tonight at 7 pm, you're in a for a huge treat! It's a live audio performance by the legendary Berlin Philharmonic conducted by Sir Simon Rattle with the dazzling German violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter.

Join us this Sunday, September 15th at 2 pm on WRTI as Sir Simon Rattle taps into an historic connection that The Philadelphia Orchestra has enjoyed with the great Finnish composer Jean Sibelius, conducting his final two symphonies without interruption, right after intermission. 

Before intermission, Curtis grad and piano superstar Lang Lang will perform Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3.

Coming up on Sunday, September 15th, WRTI's Sunday radio broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra In Concert features, on the podium, Englishman Simon Rattle, the music director of the Berlin Philharmonic.  The  internationally renowned conductor has a bond with the Philadelphians, nurtured over the last 20 years.

In the radio broadcast, Rattle leads the orchestra in a program featuring  symphonies no. 6 and 7 of  Sibelius, Norman’s Unstuck, and  Beethoven’s piano concerto No.  3 with Lang Lang as soloist.

Simon Rattle will be back on the podium this Sunday at 2 pm for a Philadelphia Orchestra performance from late May of Beethoven’s "Pastoral" Symphony, with its vivid scenes of gathering thunderstorms, wandering brooks, and breezy countrysides. We’ll also hear Webern's Passacaglia, and Three fragments from Alban Berg's shattering opera Wozzeck, both of which received their U.S. premieres in Philadelphia as part of Leopold Stokowski's vision for 20th-century music. 

This Sunday from 2 to 4 pm, The Philadelphia Orchestra renews its historic connection with the great Finnish master Jean Sibelius (Stokowski led the U.S. premieres of his last three symphonies) as Simon Rattle will conduct the final two symphonies, Nos. 6 and 7, together without interruption, from a May, 2013 concert.

Orchestra concerts don't usually leave people laughing.  But, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, some contemporary composers are combining serious music with comedy. Berlin Philharmonic Music Director Sir Simon Rattle is introducing innovative works to audiences in Germany, and brings an example with him in his upcoming visit to Philadelphia.

On May 16th, 18th and 19th, Maestro Rattle conducts The Philadelphia Orchestra at the Kimmel Center in a program that includes the music of Beethoven, Ligeti, Webern, and Berg.

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