Robert Stallman

Crossover
3:45 pm
Fri February 22, 2013

Evenings at Zimmermann's on Crossover

Flutist Robert Stallman

This week virtuoso flutist Robert Stallman and renowned harpsichordist Edwin Swanborn invite you to join them at Leipzig's famed Cafe Zimmermann for Obbligato Sonatas for Flute and Harpsichord.  Featured composer is Johann Sebastian Bach, who has also brought along a pickup group of musician friends to flesh out the evening.  

Music lovers, professionals and amateurs are all welcome to share delicious coffee, stimulating conversation, spirits and the stories behind the great music.  Saturday, February 23, 11:30 am to 12:30 pm

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Crossover
4:57 pm
Sat July 17, 2010

Virtuoso Flutist Robert Stallman

Jill's guest this week is flutist Robert Stallman. His new CD, The Nightingale in Love, features works for solo flute and ensemble from the late French Baroque era, and was recently released on the Bogner's Cafe label.

Mr. Stallman's unique sound has repeatedly captured the attention of music lovers, ever since his mentor, Jean-Pierre Rampal, judged him early on to be "one of the most gifted musicians I have ever encountered."

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Crossover
2:43 pm
Sat November 7, 2009

Flutist Robert Stallman

Jill's guest this week is virtuoso flutist Robert Stallman. His CD New Schubert Works for Flute & Strings, sonatas in transcription, was recently released on the Bogner's Cafe label.

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Crossover
4:42 pm
Sat January 10, 2009

Flutist Robert Stallman

Flutist Robert Stallman

Flutist Robert Stallman won the George W. Chadwick Medal from the New England Conservatory of Music and received a Koussevitsky Fellowship and the C.D. Jackson Prize at Tanglewood. As a Fulbright Scholar, he studied in Paris with Jean-Pierre Rampal and since then has developed an international reputation as performer, master teacher, editor and arranger who has done much to expand the flute repertoire.

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Crossover
3:25 pm
Sat March 15, 2008

Robert Stallman, flutist

Jill interviews virtuoso flutist Robert Stallman who has just issued a new album of his transcriptions of the four-hand Piano Sonatas of Mozart as Quintets for flute, viola and string quartet. An amazing realization puts these works in a new light and underscores the possible ideas that Mozart had when writing these works for four hands. The transformation of these works is enlightening and delightful, and Mr. Stallman's enthusiasm and love of the music comes through in the transcriptions and the superb performances. Mozart would agree, we think.