Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

This Sunday, the Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast brings back to the podium Musical America’s 2015 Conductor of the Year, Gianandrea Noseda, for a concert from November that begins with Liszt’s orchestrally dazzling Symphonic Poem No 6, “Mazeppa,” and a performance by renowned violinist Leonidas Kavakos of Jean Sibelius' Violin Concerto.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky is now known as a classical music giant. But in 1866, he was a young man who had switched careers and was tackling his very first symphony. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on this early work – titled by the composer, Winter Daydreams.

On Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday, July 2nd, 5-6 pm.... Recently on Discoveries we’ve been looking at the beginning generations of American composers of orchestral music. In the last decades of the 19th century they began making their way to Europe—mostly to Germany—to study their craft, which they then brought back. MacDowell, Chadwick, Parker, Paine, and others are prime examples of this pilgrimage. Their legacy remains to this day, through their music and their students.

Georgia Bertazzi

This Sunday's Philadelphia Orchestra broadcast is an all-Russian program that brings to the podium Grammy and ECHO Klassik Award-winning Italian conductor Fabio Luisi, who serves as general music director of the Zurich Opera and principal conductor of the Metropolitan Opera, where he was expected to succeed James Levine as Music Director there. But with the announcement of his new appointment as principal conductor of the Danish National Symphony in the 2017-18 season, he has effectively stepped down at the Met.

A world-premiere recording of Tchaikovsky’s first piano concerto released this year has won an international award. How can such a well-known piece be having a recording premiere? WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.


If you like your Russian served up rare – as only The Philadelphia Orchestra can prepare it – you are in for a special treat! This Sunday, August 30, it's a re-broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra's St. Petersburg Festival, Week One concert from last January, conducted by Yannick Nezet-Seguin.

The broadcast features no fewer than three 40/40 works: “Winter,” from A. Glazunov’s The Seasons, and two of five movements from Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker, all coming in the first half of the program. After intermission, you'll hear Tchaikovsky’s spectacular Symphony No. 5.

On Sunday, February 8th, The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast features Amsterdam-born conductor Jaap van Zweden, music director of both the Dallas Symphony Orchestra (since 2008) and the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra (since 2012).

In a concert first broadcast on WRTI in May of 2013, Maestro van Zweden conducts two works composed by the Russian masters Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky and Sergei Prokofiev that could hardly be more different in their purpose and effect.

Marco Borggreve

Join us this Sunday, November 9 at 1 pm for the re-broadcast of a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from last January -  part of a three-week celebration of works by Tchaikovsky and his contemporaries.

British conductor Robin Ticciati returns to Philadelphia after a highly acclaimed debut in 2012. The young maestro launches the celebration with a performance of Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 4, taking us on an emotional journey toward an exhilarating affirmation of life’s joys.

The Philadelphia Orchestra’s Tchaikovsky celebration from last January continues on WRTI this Sunday at 1 pm with Associate Conductor Cristian Macelaru joined by Principal Cellist Hai-Ye

Ryan Donnell

In the 1870s, Tchaikovsky composed such large scale works as Swan Lake, Symphonies 2, 3, and 4, and Variations on a Rococo Theme. But, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, in the same years, he was also writing short orchestral pieces with emotional power and technical virtuosity. She discusses two of these pieces, Melancolique and Valse-Scherzo, with violinist David Kim, the Philadelphia Orchestra's concertmaster .  

Music From the Inside Out: The Story of David Kim

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