Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

What a concert we have in store for you in this Sunday's broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra!  The celebrated violinist Gil Shaham is soloist and brings you all the passion, energy, and virtuoso fireworks of Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in D Major.

Tchaikovsky wrote his violin concerto in 1878, but his friends and family were critical and he didn’t find a violinist to premiere it for over three years. Now, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the concerto is one of the most frequently performed concertos in the repertoire.

In correspondence with a patron, Tchaikovsky confessed he was grappling with the idea of fate in his Symphony No. 4. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the composer tried to make sense of his world with music that still resonates today. Listen to her conversation with Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin.

Credit: Felix Broede

Join us this Sunday on WRTI for a mini festival of Russian favorites, as Principal Guest Conductor Stéphane Denève returns to Verizon Hall in this re-broadcast to conduct The Philadelphians. Download our new App to listen wherever you are in the world!

Credit: Felix Broede

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky was a highly educated member of the Russian elite. But it’s his connection with folk tunes and the countryside that especially touches one of today’s young classical stars. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

Mat Hennek for Virgin Classics

This Sunday, July 9th, WRTI’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast at 1 pm brings back to the podium the Orchestra’s Conductor-in Residence Cristian Măcelaru for the last broadcast of the 2016-17 season.

Tchaikovsky grappled with the issue of fate in an early symphonic poem, and in his 4th symphony, when he described it as a ‘fatal force.’ But, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, in his 5th symphony he suggests a way to be happy in the face of events beyond our control.

Youth and springtime are on dazzling display in this Symphony in C concert broadcast, Sunday from 4 to 6 pm on WRTI with music by Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Schubert, and Respighi.

There’s something about those tunes. From Romeo and Juliet to The Nutcracker to the 1812 Overture to the Serenade and symphonies and concertos, Tchaikovsky’s melodies were the first bits of classical music many of us first fell in love with.

This Sunday, the Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast brings back to the podium Musical America’s 2015 Conductor of the Year, Gianandrea Noseda, for a concert from November that begins with Liszt’s orchestrally dazzling Symphonic Poem No 6, “Mazeppa,” and a performance by renowned violinist Leonidas Kavakos of Jean Sibelius' Violin Concerto.

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