Philip Glass

Now Is the Time
8:06 pm
Fri November 21, 2014

Textures on Now Is the Time

Different quartets evoke different textures on Now Is the Time, Saturday, November 22nd at 9 pm at wrti.org and WRTI-HD2. Geology dominates Paul Lansky's Textures. It's for two pianists and two percussionists, and movement titles use words like striations, substrates, granite, and round-wound (makes me think of bass guitar strings). Hammering keyboards and lyrical mallets comprise this unusual foursome.

Philip Glass composed a string quartet, his fourth, in memory of the artist Brian Buczak, who died in 1987, and was a friend. The lilting, pulsing music carries a smooth sadness as its predominant Glassian texture; the great quartet Kronos brings this to us to close the program.

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Now Is the Time
5:59 am
Fri August 8, 2014

Secondary Impressions

They come in twos on Now Is the Time, Saturday, August 9th at 9 pm at wrti.org and WRTI-HD2. Joan Tower responded to Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man with numerous Fanfares for the Uncommon Woman; we'll hear No. 2. Eric McIntyre doubles down on impressionism with Secondary Impressions for saxophone and piano, and Kronos performs the Quartet No. 2 of Philip Glass.

William Hawley's Two Motets on Roman poets, sung by Volti, separates the last two instrumental works, the Four Fanfares for Two Trumpets by Andrew Rindfleisch and John Novacek's Three Rags for Two Pianos.

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Flash Choir Video!
4:39 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

A Flash Choir Sings Philip Glass in Times Square

Conductor Kent Tritle leads an impromptu choir in the world premiere of Philip Glass' "A New Rule" in New York's Times Square.

Watch a "flash choir" descend upon Times Square to sing a world premiere of music by Philip Glass, commissioned by NPR Music in honor of the composer's 75th birthday. Watch and listen here.

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Classical Headlines
12:41 pm
Sun April 8, 2012

Around The Classical Internet: April 6, 2012

Not a new Food Network show: tenor Jay Hunter Morris, as Siegfried forging his sword, in the Metropolitan Opera's controversial Ring cycle.
Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 5:08 pm

  • New York's Metropolitan Opera is gearing up to launch Wagner's complete Ring cycle, but just how "revolutionary" is the $16 million, 45-ton production? New York Times' Anthony Tommasini talks with Met GM Peter Gelb about the embattled Robert Le Page production, a conversation Parterre Box views as "damage control" on Gelb's part.
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