Philadelphia Theatre Company

On this week's Crossover, we take to the stage to hear about the Philadelphia Theatre Company's new musical comedy, Murder for Two, running now through June 28 at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre in Center City, Philadelphia.

With book and music by Joe Kinosian, book and lyrics by Kellen Blair, and direction by Scott Schwartz, the hilarious whodunit features a two-man cast, with one actor investigating the crime and the other playing all the suspects – and both playing the piano.

WRTI's Lesley Valdes reviews Bruce Graham's play that tackles tough truths. The Outgoing Tide is at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre through April 22nd.

WRTI's Susan Lewis looks at THE SCOTTSBORO BOYS - a story of injustice that became the basis for a critically acclaimed Broadway musical. The show sparked controversy and earned 12 Tony nominations in 2010. A new production featuring many from the original Broadway show is now being presented by the Philadelphia Theatre Company through February 19th.


Jim Cotter speaks with legendary playwright Edward Albee. The Philadelphia Theater Company is presenting his At Home at The Zoo.

Jason Peifer visits the Pearl S. Buck House in Bucks County. An exhibition that includes the long-lost manuscript of Buck's famous novel The Good Earth has opened at the National Historic Landmark home.

Susan Lewis visits the Sketch Club and the Plastic Club on Philadelphia's historic Camac Street, also known as the "Avenue of the Artists."

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We listen again to Jim Cotter's recent conversation with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas.

Susan Lewis looks at AMERICA I AM: The African American Imprint, an exhibition at the National Constitution Center exploring the myriad contributions African Americans have made to America.

Jason Peifer previews the Philadelphia Theater's Company production of At Home At The Zoo. We'll hear from playwright Edward Albee about this expanded version of his 1959 play, The Zoo Story. ?

Jim Cotter speaks with with Katy Friedland and Marla K. Shoemaker, authors of a new children's book A is for Art Museum. We'll also drop in on an art program for pre-schoolers at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Susan Lewis looks at Temple University's Arts and Quality of Life Research Center, where researchers are working to demonstrate links between the arts and physical well being.

Jason Peifer speaks with members of the Philadelphia Theatre Company and playwright Terrence McNally about his latest drama Unusual Acts of Devotion.

Bucks County artist Susan Opie walks us through her works of bugs and critters, now on view in the outdoor sculpture garden at the Michener Art Museum in Doylestown. The museum's ongoing Outdoor Sculpture Program features the works of contemporary American sculptors.

Jason Peifer examines the life and theatrical works of the late Wendy Wasserstein. Her final play, Third, is being produced by the Philadelphia Theater Company. Third will be performed at PTC's new home, the Suzanne Roberts Theatre.

Leif Ove Andsnes, pianist, discusses his latest projects, including a new recording with the Artemis Quartet.

The Philadelphia Theater Company moves into its new home, the Suzanne Roberts Theater.

Conservator  David Cann of Moorland Studios in New Jersey  discusses the cleaning and treatment of Alexander Calder's <i>William Penn</i>, one Philadelphia's  most beloved landmarks.


 James Undercoffler: The Philadelphia Orchestra's new president.

Public art in Philadelphia and the 100-year-old Fairmount Park Art Association.

A review of Marlborough Music Festival.

The role of the artistic director in theater (part of a continuing series) includes interviews with Terry Nolen of the Arden Theatre, the Philadelphia Theatre Company's Sara Garonzik, and Robin Marcotte from Hotel Obligado.


Ted Libbey

May 13, 2006

This week, a conversation with Ted Libbey, author of The NPR Listener's Encyclopedia of Classical Music. His book has broken new ground in publishing by having a companion website where readers can listen to full length examples of musical works cross-referenced in the book. Tom Dinardo explains how he spent six years trying to organize a performance of a work for organ by legendary Hollywood composer David Raksin. Susan Lewis explores Betsy Ross House. And Jason Peifer previews the world premiere of Some Men, a Terrence McNally play set to open at the Philadelphia Theatre Company.