The Philadelphia Orchestra

Creatively Speaking
7:18 am
Mon November 3, 2014

Stephen Hough on Tchaikovsky: Finding New Inspiration from an Old Master

Pianist Stephen Hough

Concert pianist Stephen Hough also composes, writes articles for an online publication, and likes to paint.  As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the internationally renowned soloist continues to find fresh inspiration in the great masterworks.

Stephen Hough is soloist on WRTI's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast - Sunday, November 9 at 1 pm.  Tune in to hear Hough play Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Philadelphians.

Read more
Creatively Speaking
6:07 am
Mon November 3, 2014

Robin Ticciati's Poise and Purpose

Conductor Robin Ticciati

A young British conductor is developing a fruitful relationship with The Philadelphia Orchestra. WRTI's Jim Cotter reports.

Lauded for his diverse range of conducting styles and his unique sense of silence as an expressive tool, Robin Ticciati has achieved much in his 31 years. He founded a chamber ensemble while only 21, and made his La Scala debut at 22 - the youngest conductor ever to stand on the podium of Italy’s greatest opera house.

Read more
The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI
1:05 pm
Mon October 27, 2014

The Philadelphians and Opera Philadelphia on WRTI: Strauss' SALOME, Nov. 2, 1 PM

This Sunday at 1 pm, it’s the fast-paced, one-act opera Salome, among the most important musical works of the 20th century, standing out for its revolutionary use of a large-scale orchestra and virtuosic singers, as much as for its graphic depiction of this deeply psychological tale, performed in a historic, joint production by The Philadelphia Orchestra and Opera Philadelphia. It was the Orchestra’s last concert this past May, just before they departed on their China Tour.

Read more
Creatively Speaking
11:00 am
Mon October 27, 2014

Losing His Head in the Opera, Salome: Bass-Baritone Alan Held

In Richard Strauss' SALOME, the character depicting John the Baptist is beheaded after he refuses the advances of Salome.

It was a Bible story, and then a French play by Oscar Wilde. Then it was translated into German, before Strauss turned it into his opera, Salome. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, a production from May, 2014 continued the evolution of this complex and compelling work of art.

On Sunday, November 2, 2014 at 1 pm on WRTI, listen to a recorded broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra and Opera Philadelphia performing Richard Strauss' Salome.

Creatively Speaking
6:30 am
Mon October 27, 2014

Soprano Camilla Nylund: Singing SALOME Throughout The World

Lyric dramatic soprano Camilla Nylund, a native of Finland, singing Salome with Opera Philadelphia and The Philadelphia Orchestra in May, 2014.
Dominic Mercier

Oscar Wilde’s late 19th-century play, retelling the biblical story of Salome, became the basis for Richard Strauss' one-act opera SALOME that premiered in Dresden in 1905. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the opera continues to shock and dazzle, nearly a century later.

WRTI re-broadcasts The Philadelphia Orchestra and Opera Philadelphia in a joint production of Salome, with Camilla Nylund in the title role, on Sunday, November 2 at 1 pm.

The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI
1:23 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

The Philadelphians in Concert on WRTI: Bruckner, Barber, Bartok, & Batiashvili, Oct. 26, 1 PM

Georgian violinist Lisa Batiashvili

This Sunday at 1 pm, from a Philadelphia Orchestra concert this past May at Verizon Hall, Yannick is on the podium to conduct Barber’s Adagio for Strings, an ethereal meditation that has emerged as an iconic piece of 20th-century American music; Bartok’s First Violin Concerto, played by Lisa Batiashvili, one of the world’s most sought-after violinists; and the concert will conclude with that imposing orchestral cathedral of sound known as Bruckner’s Symphony No.

Read more
Creatively Speaking
12:15 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Pictures at an Exhibition: The Evolution of a Masterpiece

Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (1839-1881)

One popular work in the orchestral repertoire was written by a Russian composer and then orchestrated decades later by a Frenchman. As WRTI's Susan Lewis reports, this version had its first performance in October in Paris  in 1922. The music describes a stroll through the gallery - a promenade - with ten specific images brought to life.

Six of the drawings and watercolors that inspired Mussorgsky have survived.  The first performance of Pictures at an Exhibition as orchestrated by Ravel took place in Paris on October 19th in 1922.

Read more
The Fabulous Philadelphians on WRTI
12:21 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

It's All Mozart on Sunday's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert Broadcast on WRTI!

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

Join us this Sunday, October 19th at 1 pm to hear the first concert from last April's Philadelphia Orchestra Mozart Celebration, which brings us three Mozart masterpieces! With Yannick on the podium, the Orchestra will play an overture to one of Mozart's three operas set to a libretto by Lorenzo Da Ponte, Cosi fan Tutte, and then continue with the Piano Concerto No.

Read more
The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI
11:24 am
Fri October 10, 2014

A Feast for Organ and Brass: The Philadelphians on WRTI, Oct. 12th, 1 PM

Conductor Alain Altinoglu

What a program! It's a re-broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI, Sunday, October 12th at 1 pm. The Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ and organist Michael Stairs are two of the biggest stars in a firmament of many! Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin had to withdraw from this performance in March, but it brought conductor Alain Altinoglu to Verizon Hall at Yannick’s recommendation, and was he ever in his element!

Read more
WRTI Spotlight
7:59 am
Thu October 2, 2014

The Philadelphians on WRTI: Yannick, Beethoven's EROICA, Oct. 5, 1 PM

German-Canadian cellist Johannes Moser

Yannick Nezet-Seguin leads the Philadelphia Orchestra at Verizon Hall in a program culminating in Beethoven's monumental Symphony No. 3, "Eroica," originally intended as a grand and heroic tribute to Napoleon. Upon learning, however, that Napoleon had crowned himself Emperor of all Europe, Beethoven scratched out the dedication with such vigor that he tore through the paper. This is music that succeeds in creating a new architecture for the symphonic form, and it supplied ignition for the Romantic style in music.

Also on the program, Richard Strauss's Metamorphosen for 23 solo strings, which opens with a haunting rhythm clearly quoting the funeral march of Beethoven’s "Eroica." The intensity and pathos is that of a mature composer, nearing the end of his career, who has witnessed the World War II destruction of Europe, and stands in stark contrast  to compositions of the younger Strauss we've heard in earlier broadcasts this season.

Filling out the program is Shostakovich’s Cello Concerto No. 1, written for the great cellist Mstislav Rostropovich and given its U.S. premiere (and first recording) by him with The Philadelphia Orchestra and Eugene Ormandy in 1959.  Our soloist is German-Canadian cellist Johannes Moser, a young virtuoso who will perform this fiendish concerto, which, like the 10th and 11th symphonies heard elsewhere in the 2013/2014 season, was written following the death of Stalin, and marks a return to greater creative freedom for Shostakovich.

Here's Johannes Moser performing in 2011. During intermission, WRTI's Susan Lewis will speak with the young cellist.

Program:
Strauss - Metamorphosen
Shostakovich - Cello Concerto No. 1
Beethoven - Symphony No. 3 ("Eroica")
Yannick Nézet-Séguin - Conductor
Johannes Moser - Cello

That's the Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI, Sunday, October 5, 1 to 3:30 pm. Don't miss it!

You can listen to our 90.1 FM broadcast, or online here.

Gregg Whiteside is producer and host.

Pages