The Philadelphia Orchestra

When the Philadelphia Orchestra commissioned Jonathan Leshnoff to write a concerto for principal clarinetist Ricardo Morales, the composer realized a connection between the clarinet and...the Hebrew alphabet. WRTI's Debra Lew Harder explains.


Join us for a re-broadcast of a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from 2016 that brings us two Philadelphia Orchestra commissions—Maurice Wright’s Resounding Drums, a timpani concerto composed for the Orchestra’s principal timpanist Don Liuzzi, and the Clarinet Concerto by Jonathan Leshnoff, composed for the principal clarinetist of the Philadelphians, Ricardo Morales.

Jan Regan / Philadelphia Orchestra

The Philadelphia Orchestra is back from its debut in Mongolia, where planned full-orchestra concerts needed to be canceled due to a nation-wide financial crisis. Instead, a contingent of 18 musicians spent two days in the capital city of Ulaanbaatar. Now, the Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns asks what this could lead to.

A New Take on Timpani

Jun 19, 2017

There aren't many concertos composed for timpani. But, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, Maurice Wright has written a work that celebrates the instrument and its often untapped range.

It's a special three-hour Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast, on Sunday at 1 pm and Monday night at 7 pm on HD-2, capturing highlights of the Orchestra’s three-day Rachmaninoff Festival at the end of April.

Steve Prince

Composer Hannibal Lokumbe continues to take his music into the city's communities on June 15th, 16th, and 17th, highlighting the roles music can play in fostering forgiveness and healing. This is his second extended visit to Philadelphia, as part of his three-year, composer-in-residency with The Philadelphia Orchestra.

Sergei Rachmaninoff was so distressed by the negative reaction to the 1897 premiere of his first symphony, he stopped composing for nearly three years. What restored his confidence to compose his much-loved Piano Concerto No.2? WRTI’s Susan Lewis has the story.

If you missed the broadcast on Sunday, June 11th, listen on Monday night at 7 pm! WRTI’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast begins and ends with works by Finnish masters and is conducted by Principal Guest Conductor Stéphane Denève. And in between? Pianist Lars Vogt plays one of Grieg's most popular works.

Edvard Grieg was just 24 when he wrote his only completed piano concerto in 1868. It's one of his greatest works, and launched his international career. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.
 


Special rebroadcast! The Philadelphia Orchestra, in Asia this week, has been doing quite of bit of traveling on its own, and on Monday, June 5th at 7 pm on HD-2 and WRTI.org, WRTI will turn back the clock and rebroadcast this Vienna Festival concert, previously aired on March 20th of last year. It was a memorable performance, conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, of two symphonies composed roughly 80 years apart: Joseph Haydn’s 103rd, the famous “Drumroll” Symphony, and Anton Bruckner’s 4th.

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