Music Features

Heroic, indeed.  So much so, that his first CD is called, Héroïque.  Sure, the title refers to the music on tenor Bryan Hymel's freshman solo recording, a portrayal of the heroic figures of French grand opera. But to accurately portray those characters, it doesn't hurt to have an heroic voice.

The Particular Nature of Duane Eubanks

Mar 17, 2015

Trumpeter Duane Eubanks isn’t yet as well known as his brothers (trombonist Robin and guitarist Kevin), but his highly listenable album, Things Of A Particular Nature, should mitigate his under-the-radar status. This Philadelphia native is a top-notch musician, having fronted the horn section in the late pianist Mulgrew Miller’s group, Wingspan, and as a member of two-time Grammy-winning Dave Holland Big Band, while playing with many others.

American Masters is the title of a recently released CD, referring to the composers and works that appear on the disc.  But the term can just as easily be applied to the performer - violinist Anne Akiko Meyers.

Anne is no stranger to Crossover listeners, and we're lucky to be able to speak with her whenever something new is on her horizon, which winds up being quite frequently. This time around, she introduces us to one of today's bright lights in the composing world, Mason Bates.

When Alita Moses stepped onto the stage for the finals of the 2014 Shure Montreux Jazz Voice Competition in Switzerland last July, she had come a long way from West Hartford, Connecticut, and a long way from Philadelphia’s University of the Arts, where she is a senior jazz vocal major.

At Crossover, we're lucky that so many great guests are willing to return to speak with us - and you! Montenegrin guitarist Miloš Karadaglić is one of them.

The spotlight is on the alto of the string section on Now Is the Time, Saturday, March 7th at 9 pm. John Harbison's sumptuous Viola Concerto starts the program off, and then duoJalal percussionist Yousif Sheronick turns a Philip Glass solo viola work into a Duo for Solo Percussion and Viola, just as he would have when he played in the Philip Glass Ensemble.

On Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday March 1st, 2015, 5-6 pm... Continuing our survey of the year 1915, we find one of the few people of the time—composers, critics, or audience members—who liked both Brahms and Wagner, and that's Karl Goldmark. A Hungarian composer trying to make his way in Vienna, he took on other jobs in and related to music. One of those jobs was music criticism.

At first, “I really wanted to play the clarinet,” admits flutist Megan Emigh (pronounced AY-mee), who is principal flute for Symphony in C. She explains that the idea was to start, at age 4, on flute, and then switch later to the differently pitched clarinet, where a player has to learn how to transpose. But she liked the flute (even though her older sister already played one). “I never switched!”

It's funny. Just when you think you know someone inside out and upside-down, you're hit with the realization that you really only know half the story. That's Jose Serebrier. The 76-year-old, Uruguayan-born Serebrier is one of the best-known and most-frequently recorded conductors of his generation. But, did you know he is also quite a prolific and accomplished composer? He is. So much so that he considers himself not a conductor who also composes, but a composer who also conducts.

New York Philharmonic Music Director Alan Gilbert walks across Lincoln Center Plaza to conduct the Metropolitan Opera in this perennial favorite of Mozart's Don Giovanni. Peter Mattei is the rakish Don, Elza van den Heever is Donna Anna, Luca Pisaroni as Leporello declaims his catalog aria, and James Morris takes Don Giovanni to his judgment as The Commendatore.