Ludwig van Beethoven

The second movement of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7—the Allegretto—has captivated listeners since the symphony’s 1813 premiere, when it was so popular that the orchestra used it as an encore. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on why this particular movement continues to engages us.

April 9, 2018. A new release featuring pianist Murray Perahia connects the consummate artist to two Beethoven sonatas that have yet to be included in his studio repertoire.

The National Library of Congress has shared its latest batch of musical inductees to the National Recording Registry. The 25 works — a mix of singles, field recordings, albums and soundtracks — represent myriad genres and time periods, and bring the Registry's overall catalog up to 500 entries.

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony premiered in 1808 and was praised as "one of the most important works of the time" by critic E.T.A. Hoffman. WRTI’s Susan Lewis explores why, in the more than 200 years since, the work retains its extraordinary appeal.


Dario Acosta

WRTI’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast this Sunday, March 11th brings to the airwaves the final week of the Orchestra’s British Isles Festival conducted by Fabio Luisi.

It was the fall of 1802 when Ludwig van Beethoven confessed his nearly fatal despair about his growing deafness, in what’s now known as his "Heiligenstadt Testament." His music then took a daring new turn. WRTI’s Susan Lewis talks with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas about Beethoven's Symphony No. 3, "Eroica."

Lisa Marie Mazzucco

WRTI 90.1 was proud to present the world-renowned Daedalus Quartet LIVE in our performance studio, on Friday, February 2, at 12 noon, for a program of Beethoven’s String Quartets—they're among the most profound works of chamber music ever written. Watch on the WRTI Facebook page! 

Join us for a fabulous concert broadcast from the Philadelphia Orchestra’s 2015 St. Petersburg Festival, celebrating the great master of the third generation, Dmitri Shostakovich. Sunday, January 28th at 1 pm on WRTI 90.1, and Monday, January 29th at 7 pm on WRTI HD-2.

Four notes (the first three of which are the same) say “classical music” to more people around the world than any other bit of music anyone else has ever written. When Ludwig van Beethoven finally chose those notes, he not only figured out the beginning of his Fifth Symphony and branded classical music forever, he also staked a claim—with an audacity and a power unlike anyone else before or since—to be recognized as “the” composer of classical music.

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