Latest Classical from NPR Music

Deceptive Cadence
11:58 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Harmonic. Phil Harmonic.

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon, or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

Deceptive Cadence
10:50 am
Thu November 15, 2012

From Schubert To Hendrix: Guest DJ Matt Haimovitz

From coffeehouses to punk clubs, Matt Haimovitz has played his cello in some surprising places.
Steph Mackinnon

Originally published on Mon November 19, 2012 7:49 am

  • Listen To The Session

These days it's not unusual to find classical musicians performing in unlikely venues — pubs, clubs and out-of-the-way places. But long before this trend took hold there was Matt Haimovitz. Ten years ago, the intrepid cellist lugged his instrument across the country, bringing music by J.S. Bach to barrooms, coffeehouses and even Manhattan's famous punk club CBGB.

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Classics in Concert
1:16 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Carnegie Hall Live: Gardiner Leads Beethoven's Missa Solemnis

John Eliot Gardiner leads the Orchestre Revolutionnaire et Romantique and the Monteverdi Choir at Carnegie Hall in New York, NY on November 17, 2012.
Melanie Burford for NPR

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 2:46 pm

PERFORMERS:

Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique

Monteverdi Choir

John Eliot Gardiner, artistic director and conductor

Elisabeth Meister, soprano

Jennifer Johnston, mezzo-soprano

Michael Spyres, tenor

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Deceptive Cadence
8:55 am
Tue November 13, 2012

Classical Lost And Found: The Versatile Sound Of Vivian Fung

Composer Vivian Fung's new album embraces the influence of John Cage and introduces her own versatile sound.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 5:41 pm

There are those who consider John Cage to be one of America's most important avant-garde composers, and consequently the recent flurry of celebrations and album releases honoring what would have been his 100th birthday continues. On the other hand, many conservative listeners tend to dismiss his pieces as preposterous gimmickry, rendering the performers little more than Foley artists.

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Deceptive Cadence
7:03 am
Mon November 12, 2012

Daniel Barenboim Remembers Elliott Carter

Composer Elliott Carter, who died on Nov. 5 at age 103.
Meredith Heuer courtesy of Boosey & Hawkes

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 10:55 am

Over the course of an exceptionally long and productive life, the late Elliott Carter was championed by many leading conductors, soloists and ensembles. Among the most prominent is pianist and conductor Daniel Barenboim, who has premiered many of Carter's works.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
6:19 am
Mon November 12, 2012

Classical Crib Sheet: Top 5 Stories This Week

American composer Elliott Carter, circa 1975. He died this Monday at age 103.
Erich Auerbach Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 11:41 am

  • Elegies poured in this week for composer Elliott Carter, who died Monday, a month shy of his 104th birthday. My colleague Tom Cole: "He saw his music go from derision to international acclaim.
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Music News
5:32 pm
Sat November 10, 2012

Verdi's 'La Forza,' Born Under A Bad Sign

Soprano Maria Slatinaru and bass Paul Plishka perform in a 1986 production of Verdi's La Forza del Destino at the San Francisco Opera.
Ron Scherl Redferns

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 10:59 am

One hundred fifty years ago today, Giuseppe Verdi first mounted his opera La Forza del Destino ("The Force of Destiny") on a stage in St. Petersburg, Russia. Today, La Forza is considered one of Verdi's masterpieces, but it wasn't always that way. The story of Don Alvaro, whose love for the aristocratic Leonora incurs the wrath of her family, is violent and chaotic, and it flopped on its first run.

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Music News
12:10 am
Sat November 10, 2012

A Veteran's Standing Ovation, 70 Years In The Making

This month, a symphony composed by World War II veteran Harold Van Heuvelen had its premiere.
Kevin Gift

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 10:55 am

When you reach a certain age, big life surprises tend to come few and far between, unless you're Harold Van Heuvelen. Van, as everyone calls him, has had a blockbuster week full of dreams fulfilled. The story of his dream starts more than 70 years ago, on Dec. 7, 1941.

Van Heuvelen enlisted in the Army after Pearl Harbor. He was posted to a base in New Orleans as an instructor for recruits. He spent the war stateside, training men who were being shipped out to Europe and the South Pacific.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
12:00 am
Sat November 10, 2012

John Williams' Inevitable Themes

Flanked by composer Leonard Slatkin and soprano Jessye Norman, John Williams takes a bow during his 80th-birthday celebration at Tanglewood in August.
Stu Rosner

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 10:52 am

For more than 50 years, John Williams' music has taken us to galaxies far, far away through adventures here on earth, made us feel giddy joy and occasionally scared us to death.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:56 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Young Nate Silver Picks A Career

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon, or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

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