Keeping Score

It was April 7, 18o5: Beethoven turned the music world on its ear at the premiere of what - up until that time - was the longest, most complicated symphonic work ever composed. His 3rd symphony, the Eroica, changed our idea of what music could express. 

Instead of classical form and rarified beauty, the symphony laid out the full range of human feelings and emotions. The first public performance of Beethoven's Eroica is the theme for this Sunday's show. March 24, 4 to 5 pm.

It's August 8, 1803, and Parisian Piano Maker Sebastien Erard Gives One of His Sturdy New Creations to Beethoven - a new piano! With this instrument, the composer was able to set aside his forte piano and write more expressive and emotional music, beginning with the Waldstein Sonata.

The San Francisco Symphony’s radio project, The Keeping Score Series: 13 Days When Music Changed Forever, is about musical revolutions—about the composers, compositions, and musical movements that changed the way people heard, or thought about, music. Each program explores the historical backdrop and the musical precursors to the revolutionary change, as well as the lasting influence of that moment in music history.

This week's program: October 29, 1787:  The Premiere of Don Giovanni in Prague
With this work, Mozart attains his maturity and writes a masterpiece that dominates opera forever, echoing in Wagner and beyond. Suzanne Vega is host. Sunday, February 10, 5 to 6 pm.