John Coltrane

Two Englishmen, Guy Wood and Robert Mellin, slipped it into the Great American Songbook just before it closed, just as rock rolled over sophistication. It begins from below, a slowly twisting Roman candle of a tune, and explodes in the top range of the singer, as the eyes of onlookers reflect the glory of what songs once were.

Born in North Carolina in 1926, saxophone player and composer John Coltrane spent over a decade in Philadelphia and then moved to New York. WRTI's Susan Lewis considers the impact of Coltrane, who expanded the boundaries of jazz with a wide range of styles.

While jazz giant John Coltrane was born and raised in North Carolina, and died in New York, he spent 15 years in Philadelphia. WRTI’s Susan Lewis looks at the role the city played in the career of this master sax player and composer, who would have turned 90 this month.

John Coltrane expanded how we hear music. He took the light and airy Broadway show tune, “My Favorite Things,” and turned it (with soprano saxophone) into a dark, driving, melodic, polyrhythmic tour de force.

Rudy Van Gelder, an audio recording engineer who captured the sounds of many of jazz's landmark albums, died Thursday morning in his sleep. He was at his home studio in New Jersey, according to Maureen Sickler, his assistant engineer. He was 91.

It took ten years to write Whisper Not, The Autobiography of Benny Golson, by tenor saxophonist and composer Benny Golson and his longtime friend, writer Jim Merod. Walking down the “corridor of life” Golson says, there are surprises, delightful and not.

This year, 2016, marks the 100th anniversary of the first Great Migration, the movement of millions of African-Americans from the rural south to other parts of the U.S. that promised greater social and economic justice and opportunities. The migration included many excellent jazz musicians, some of whom became household names. For these artists, the Great Migration also provided inspiration for their creative expression.

1966. Frank Sinatra. The Beatles. The Righteous Brothers.  Stevie Wonder. Petula Clark. Bob Dylan. The formation of the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Music was coming from all directions....enter John Coltrane.

After an extensive career as a sideman and then 1960's bandleader, Trane's sonic explorations led him to push the envelope of what was popularly called jazz. His multi-dimensional experiments with scales, instrumentation, and format forever extended the boundaries of jazz.

'A Love Supreme' Comes Alive In Unearthed Photos

Mar 28, 2014

Whenever photographer Chuck Stewart was hired by a record company to document a recording session, he would shoot during the rehearsal takes, playback and downtime. The company would take what it needed, the remainder likely never to be developed, much less published. After decades in the photography business, and thousands of album covers to his name, he's amassed a lot of negatives.

Today, All Things Considered continues its Mom and Dad's Record Collection series with a musician who is a heir of American musical royalty.