Jazz Appreciation Month

Throughout this month, from early evening to the wee small hours of the morning, our jazz staff will be telling you about special moments that created, or perpetuated, their love for this great music. Each of these moments will be accompanied by a favorite song.

One night recently, as I was home struggling to convince my toddler that the floor is not where leftover food lives, John Coltrane and Duke Ellington’s “In A Sentimental Mood” came on the radio. Suddenly, I found myself paying a bit more attention to the music than the drama at hand. Why? Because I knew what was coming....that specific moment in the song that always gets to me. There's a total mood shift as the timing completely changes and you start to notice the drums more and more. And then you start to wonder if the drums were even there at all during the beginning of the tune.

The 12th official Jazz Appreciation Month began when April did. But today, the Smithsonian Museum of American History, which founded the JAM campaign, kick started its own celebration with a series of performances, discussions and ceremonies.

Join WRTI through the month of April as we celebrate the art form that is our lifestyle...Jazz! During each jazz shift, WRTI hosts will feature music by an artist who has shaped jazz into the multi-faceted genre that it is today.  You'll hear the great vocalists, bandleaders, instrumentalists and composers, as well as the stories behind their jazz innovation.

You can expect to hear these featured artists at 7 pm, 10 pm, 1 am and 5 am each day. Also, keep an ear out for special jazz interviews and tidbits sprinkled throughout our regular programming.

Around The Jazz Internet: April 6, 2012

Apr 8, 2012

Poll: does this look like Duke Ellington or not? How about this? Washington D.C. wants to know.

Put some swing into your spring...check out all of the jazz events around town this month. Plus, on WRTI we’ll broadcast special jazz tributes every night in April. You’ll hear short biographical sketches of jazz musicians (past and present) with regional ties. And after each sketch, we’ll play music from the featured artists. You’ll be able to catch our vignettes every day at 7 pm, 10 pm, 1 am, and 5 am.

Earl Rudolph "Bud" Powell (September 27, 1924 - July 31, 1966) was an American Jazz pianist. Powell has been described as one of "the two most significant pianists of the style of modern jazz that came to be known as bop", the other being his friend and contemporary Thelonious Monk. Along with Monk, Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, Powell was a key player in the history of bebop, and his virtuosity as a pianist led many to call him "the Charlie Parker of the piano".

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Jazz Appreciation Month

Apr 3, 2006

WRTI's Jim Hilgen takes a look at this uniquely American art form.