Hilary Hahn

This Sunday at 1 pm, listen to Joshua Bell play Bernstein in a 2013 broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, it was part of a celebration of the Renaissance man who influenced so many, including Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin.

We'll be at Verizon Hall this Sunday at 2 pm bringing you a LIVE concert broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, performing Bernstein’s Serenade—a musical retelling of Plato's ode to love—with soloist Hilary Hahn, the Orchestra’s 2017/18 artist-in-residence.

Michael Patrick O’Leary

Violinist Hilary Hahn performs the fourth violin concerto of the Belgian composer and violinist Henri Vieuxtemps on The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast, Sunday, August 21st at 1 pm. This concerto is a favorite of Ms. Hahn’s; Vieuxtemps composed it while he was serving as violinist to Tsar Nicholas I in St. Petersburg.


Does a song, or even a symphony, trigger memories of important moments and milestones in your life? For violinist Hillary Hahn, a little-known, 19th-century concerto is an important part of her history and her current repertoire.


Stephen Hahn

It’s just after 1:00 in the afternoon, and I’m holding up a wall backstage at the Kimmel Center, after watching a Philadelphia Orchestra rehearsal with Music Director Yannick Nezet-Seguin and soloist Hilary Hahn. Musicians are heading out, the hall is emptying.

Violinist Hilary Hahn is known for putting together some unusual programs. On her latest album, she pairs Mozart's Violin Concerto No. 5 in A major with 19th century Belgian composer Henri Vieuxtemps' Violin Concerto No. 4 in D minor.

[Update: Yes! Hilary Hahn won in her category on February 8, 2015]

An encore may be played after a scheduled piece. However, it’s not an afterthought. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, violinist Hillary Hahn’s collection of commissioned encores, that is up for a GRAMMY for "Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance" at next month’s ceremony, showcases more than two dozen such works for violin and piano.

Radio script:

Perhaps classical violinist Hilary Hahn could have a second career in design; she has a keen sense for combining opposites and making them shine together. She intersperses Paganini and Bach into her concerts with singer-songwriter Josh Ritter, while on CD, she pairs Schoenberg with Sibelius and Tchaikovsky with a 21st-century work. For this solo Tiny Desk Concert, Hahn does it again - J.S. Bach and Charles Ives, side by side.--from NPR

Yannick Nezet-Seguin is on the podium this Sunday at 2 pm in a recorded concert from this past May, which featured Hilary Hahn's return to Philadelphia for Korngold's Violin Concerto. This colorful and cinematic score grew out of Korngold's success in Hollywood while writing many of his treasured film soundtracks.

Also on the program, trademark fanfares, folk melodies, and thunderous crescendos punctuate Mahler's First Symphony, along with humorous folk tunes and inventive orchestrations.

Classical music soloists must spend a lot of time practicing their instruments. But some stars are connecting with fans in ways that reach beyond the concert hall. WRTI’s Susan Lewis spoke with pianist Jonathan Biss and violinist Hilary Hahn.

WRTI's Philadelphia Orchestra In Concert broadcast on August 25th features Jonathan Biss playing Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 13. On September 29th, WRTI's concert broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra includes Hilary Hahn playing Korngold's Violin Concerto.

Listen to Susan's interview with Jonathan Biss about writing and other activities beyond the concert hall.

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