Glenn Gould

Bach Old and New

Oct 2, 2014

On Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday, Oct. 4th, 5 to 6 pm. Every generation comes up with new ways to perform Johann Sebastian Bach. This tells us two things. One: Performance practice is as vital and relevant as ever. Rather than imagining forgotten professors paging through dusty tomes, we might envision performers kicking up dust with brilliant concerts of so-old-it’s-new repertoire.

What's going on here, I can only guess, but here's what you're about to see: In the video below, the great musician Glenn Gould, supreme interpreter of Bach, is sitting at his living room piano on a low, low chair, his nose close to the keys. He's at his Canadian country house in his bathrobe.

Pianist Glenn Gould died in 1982 of a stroke. He was only 52 years old. Today he would have turned 80.

Jim Cotter speaks with pianist Simone Dinnerstein about a computer generated re-recording of Glenn Gould's legendary performance of Bach's Goldberg Variations. Her own recording of the 'Variations has been on the classical music charts for 18 weeks now.

Jason Peifer takes us the Independence Seaport Museum in Philadelphia.

Susan Lewis visits an exhibition of the works of the prominent late nineteenth century Italian painter Antonio Mancini at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.


Pianist Simone Dinnerstein talks about the legendary Glenn Gould and the digital re-performance of his 1955 Goldberg Variations. Dinnerstein, whose own version of Bach's Goldberg Variations has reached the top of the classical music charts, tells us if technology can replicate the man. Also, Amadeus at Philadelphia's Wilma Theater is reviewed.