Gianandrea Noseda

This Sunday, the Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast brings back to the podium Musical America’s 2015 Conductor of the Year, Gianandrea Noseda, for a concert from November that begins with Liszt’s orchestrally dazzling Symphonic Poem No 6, “Mazeppa,” and a performance by renowned violinist Leonidas Kavakos of Jean Sibelius' Violin Concerto.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky is now known as a classical music giant. But in 1866, he was a young man who had switched careers and was tackling his very first symphony. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on this early work – titled by the composer, Winter Daydreams.

One leader headed to our nation’s capital aims to bring people together - not through political speeches, but through music. WRTI's Susan Lewis has more on the National Symphony Orchestra's music director designate, who’s passionate about the power of music even beyond the concert hall and opera stage.


The dazzling Macedonian pianist Simon Trpceski performs Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini this Sunday, February 14th from 1 to 3 pm on WRTI’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast, recorded live this past November.


Italian composer Alfredo Casella’s Symphony No 2 is a major work composed in 1910 that is little known today. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, a contemporary conductor is working to change that, leading it in cities around the world, including Philadelphia, in its U.S. premiere.  


One of the highlights of last year's Philadelphia Orchestra season took place in March, when Carol Jantsch, principal tuba of the orchestra since 2006, stood front and center on the Verizon Hall stage to perform as soloist in a work written for her – Michael Daugherty’s Reflections on the Mississippi. Janstch premiered the work two years ago, a piece that Daugherty calls “a musical reflection on family trips to the Mississippi River during my childhood.”

Join us for a very special treat on Sunday, March 22nd as our Philadelphia Orchestra broadcast comes to you LIVE from Verizon Hall at 2 pm - an hour later than usual - in a concert featuring violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, a Philadelphia favorite since she debuted with the Orchestra at the age of 10.

She joins conductor Gianandrea Noseda for a performance of Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto, one of the most popular works in the violin repertory.

The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast this Sunday at 1 pm opens with a collection of “Symphonic Fragments” from Alfredo Casella’s rarely performed opera La Donna Serpente (The Snake-Woman), based on an 18th-century fable-play by Carlo Gozzi, and is followed by one of Sergei Prok

Early 20th-century Italian composer, pianist, and conductor Alfredo Casella promoted music of his compatriots. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the 21st-century conductor Giandrea Noseda is shining a light on Casella’s lesser-known work.

Listen to a performance of Alfredo Casella's Barcarola e Scherzo for Flute and Piano, Op. 4 (1903):

If anybody knows Rachmaninoff, it’s The Philadelphia Orchestra. The ensemble inspired the composer  to write his final orchestral work: the Symphonic Dances, and collaborated with him intensively until his death in 1943. Since then, the Orchestra has maintained an unbroken tradition of performing works by Rachmaninoff, from the eras of Eugene Ormandy through Charles Dutoit. 

The esteemed Italian conductor Gianandrea Noseda, who has the trust and affection of the musicians from past guest engagements, recently conducted Rachmaninoff at the Kimmel Center. The conductor brought to these performances the rediscovery of a sound from which the orchestra has perhaps drifted. As The Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns reports, Noseda may just about be out-Ormandying Eugene Ormandy.