Gabriel Faure

The Faure Requiem – with full orchestra, choir, and soloists - premiered on July 12, 1900. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, it was not a typical requiem, nor was it the first incarnation of the work. 

Radio script:

Susan Lewis: The Faure Requiem, known to us today, had its first performance at a World’s Fair, the Paris Exposition of 1900. Also, its not the original version.

WRTI's Mark Pinto, host of the Classical New Releases show, fills you in on the latest and the greatest classical music CDs every Saturday at 5 pm. Here are five newly released recordings he recommends:

Fauré: A Requiem For A Healthy Young Man?

Oct 8, 2014

Gabriel Fauré began composing his Requiem in D minor at an unusual time - in his 30s, and nowhere near the end of his life. This setting of the Mass for the Dead for orchestra, chorus, and two soloists is famous for its central soprano aria Pie Jesu - also known as the "lullaby" requiem.

As WRTI’s Jim Cotter reports, the soprano Susanna Phillips says doing justice to this piece is a little like being in love. You'll hear Faure's Requiem, performed by The Philadelphia Orchestra on WRTI, Sunday October 12 at 1 pm.

This time, he’d show them. The Paris Conservatoire accepted Ravel as a piano student at age 16, and even though he won a piano competition, more than anything he wanted to compose. But the Conservatory was a hard place. He never won the fugue prize, never won the composition prize, never won anything for writing music and they sent him packing. Twice. He studied with the great Gabriel Fauré, in school and out, but he just couldn’t make any headway with the ruling musical authorities.