Franz Schubert

We had a sneak preview of the Curtis Institute’s final Schubertiade events, as Curtis students performed excerpts from Schubert's Trio in B-flat Major in D, LIVE from WRTI's Performance Studio on Thursday, February 15th at 12:10 p.m. WRTI's Jack Moore hosted. 


It's so easy to find oneself attracted to the music of Franz Schubert. His unmatched gift for lyricism makes him so approachable, so comprehensible; and we feel ourselves being pulled into his musical world—in my case, at a very early age. 

A glorious work, infrequently heard in the concert hall, will grace the airwaves this Sunday, July 23rd at 1 pm, as the Philadelphia Orchestra, soloists, and the Westminster Symphonic Choir perform Mozart's Great Mass in C minor at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall. Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts.

Youth and springtime are on dazzling display in this Symphony in C concert broadcast, Sunday from 4 to 6 pm on WRTI with music by Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Schubert, and Respighi.

It’s into the vault this Sunday for a January 30th, 2006 concert recorded in the Perelman Theater at the Kimmel Center, and conducted by then Music Director and current Conductor Laureate Ignat Solzhenitsyn. Join us on Sunday, September 18th from 5 to 6 pm to hear the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia perform Franz Schubert’s Symphony No. 9, known as "The Great C Major Symphony," to distinguish it from Schubert's Symphony No. 6  in the same key.

Among the hundreds of outdoor sculptures that dot Philadelphia’s urban landscape are three classical music masters. But they're not where you might expect to find them.

It was 201 years ago this week that Franz Schubert (1797-1828) wrote a song that would alter the course of music history. WRTI’s Kile Smith looks at “Gretchen at the Spinning Wheel,” an unassuming title for Schubert’s first masterpiece and the start of an entire genre of music.


Shawn Northcutt

Though born in Canada, violinist Shannon Lee’s story really starts in Texas; for it was there that she began her musical journey. With three-year-old hands too small for the piano, Lee began Suzuki violin classes instead. 

By the time she completed all 10 Suzuki books, much of her social life revolved around rehearsals, workshops and music camps. For Lee, “play” has always meant music. 

At the age of 8, Lee secured the mentor who would nurture her through the end of high school - Jan Mark Sloman, then the Principal Associate Concertmaster of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. 

Among the hundreds of outdoor sculptures that dot Philadelphia’s urban landscape are three classical music masters. But, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, they’re not where you might expect to find them.

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