Dmitri Shostakovich

Join us for an intense performance of Shostakovich's Violin Concerto No. 1 by Lisa Batiashvili with The Philadelphia Orchestra under Yannick Nezet-Seguin. This was the centerpiece of the last concert of the 2014/2015 season and a program the Orchestra took on its European tour, which was a stunning success.


Twentieth-century Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich composed much of his work under the shadow of political oppression. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, today, his music and his personal story continue to inspire a new generation.


Tara McMullen

Be sure to join us Sunday, January 10th at 1 pm for our weekly Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast! Guest conductor Marin Alsop and pianist Jon Kimura Parker join the Philadelphians for George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue. This is the original jazz band version, Ferde Grofe’s faithful orchestration of Paul Whiteman’s arrangement.

Join us on Sunday, September 13th at 1 pm for a re-broadcast from the final week of The Philadelphia Orchestra’s January 2015 St. Petersburg Festival, celebrating the great master of the third generation, Dmitri Shostakovich. Like Tchaikovsky before him, Shostakovich visited Philadelphia just once, but his connections to the Orchestra were unmatched by any other American ensemble. Of his 15 symphonies, seven received their first U.S. performance by the Philadelphians.

Dmitri Shostakovich, known for many dramatic works composed in the shadow of Stalin, showed a different side - one filled with humor and family ties - in his Piano Concerto No. 2.

Listen to WRTI on Sunday, September 13, 2015 at 1 pm as Kirill Gerstein performs Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto No. 2 with The Philadelphia Orchestra. Details here.

Ken Howard

Join us this Saturday for a rare revival of Dmitri Shostakovich’s searing drama Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, heard in an archived Met Opera performance from November. Shostakovich’s towering tragedy of adultery and murder stars the commanding dramatic soprano Eva-Maria Westbroek as the heroine who suffers the vicissitudes of her treachery. Brandon Jovanovich is her co-conspirator and lover, and James Conlon conducts. Saturday, April 18, 1 to 4:15 pm on WRTI.

In early 1941, Dmitri Shostakovich was nervous. He was one of Soviet Russia's most brilliant composers, but he had fallen out of favor with the ruthless dictator Joseph Stalin.

He'd been forced to denounce several of his own pieces of music, and some of his friends and family had been imprisoned or killed. He knew the same thing could happen to him.

With this Tiny Desk Concert by the Grammy-winning Pacifica Quartet, we have the opportunity to explore the world of a single composer. With the arguable exception of Béla Bartók's six string quartets, it's generally accepted that the 15 by Dmitri Shostakovich are the strongest body of quartets since Beethoven.

This season, The Philadelphia Orchestra juxtaposed Beethoven’s path-breaking symphonies and concertos with those of the great orchestral master of the 20th century Dmitri Shostakovich...we’ll be treated to such a pairing Sunday afternoon at 1 pm.

Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich, who had been in and out of favor with Soviet authorities for decades, wrote his 10th symphony in 1953 - the year Stalin died. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the work is both political and personal, with parts written in musical code.

On Sunday, June 8, 2014, on WRTI, Stephane Deneve leads The Philadelphia Orchestra in a performance of Shostakovich's 10th Symphony and Beethoven's Violin Concerto.

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