DAVID PATRICK STEARNS

Jan Regan

The Philadelphia Orchestra’s three-week swing through Germany, France, Holland and England left cheering audiences in its wake. Minutes before going onstage at London’s Royal Festival Hall for the final concert of the tour, Music Director Yannick Nezet-Seguin told the Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns what made him the happiest.

David Patrick Stearns: The Viennese were the toughest. The Londoners were the smartest. The Parisians were...well, Yannick Nezet-Seguin explained it best.

The Mendelssohn Club Choir mounted its biggest-ever production last April, 2014 with the premiere of Anthracite Fields by the cutting-edge composer Julia Wolfe, who is exploring the coal-mining culture in her Pennsylvania roots. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns met with her...inside a coal mine. 

Update:

Pete Checchia

You never know where you're going to run into The Philadelphia Orchestra. An earthquake zone in China? Tokyo's Suntory Hall? Last week, as The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns reports, it was the Reading Terminal Market, where 11 string players crowded into the lunchtime bustle and invited everyday people to try their hand at conducting.

The Pennsylvania Philharmonic may be the ultimate anomaly: an orchestra that's being born rather than fearing its death. The idea is that if the outlying Pennsylvania towns can't support an orchestra on its own, maybe four or five or six can do so between them - and afford the star pianist Simone Dinnerstein. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns reports from Pottstown.

One of the better ideas of The Philadelphia Orchestra’s tour of China and Japan turned out to be one of the toughest concerts of all: a Saturday morning pop-up performance by a quartet of French horn players at the ancient ruins of St Paul's Cathedral in Macau. The Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns withstood the tropical heat right along with them.

David Lindsay-Abaire would seem to have a case of multiple creative personalities. The Pulitzer-winning playwright wrote the book and lyrics to Shrek the Musical and worked on the screenplay to The Great and Powerful Oz. 

He’s now represented by a hugely different theatrical work at the Walnut Street Theatre, a play titled Good People about hard-scrabble life and class struggle in South Boston, or “Southie.” The Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns spoke to the playwright in his Brooklyn home and discovered that Good People is the real him.