Creatively Speaking

Creatively Speaking
6:02 am
Mon September 29, 2014

Celebrating C.P.E. Bach: The Sentimental Rebel

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (March 8, 1714 – December 14, 1788)

J.S. Bach’s second-surviving son, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714-1788), was a musical force in his own right. His fame, at least after the mid-1700s, overshadowed that of his now-legendary father. This year, six German cities with ties to C.P.E.’s musical footprint in Hamburg, Berlin, Frankfurt (Oder), Leipzig, Potsdam, and Weimar are leading a celebration of the 300th anniversary of his birth.   

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Creatively Speaking
10:46 am
Mon September 22, 2014

Up-and-Coming Orchestras Impress At This Year's Proms

Royal Albert Hall in London

This year, the trend-setting BBC Proms at the Royal Albert Hall had a season that brought in orchestras from the least-likely of places: Lapland, Iceland and Turkey.  What could they bring to a table dominated by the storied orchestras of Vienna and Berlin? A distinctive national identity, says the Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns.

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Creatively Speaking
6:37 am
Mon September 22, 2014

The Bassoon's Lyrical Beauty

Daniel Matsukawa

Many great composers in history wrote for the bassoon. But in the last 70 years or so, the instrument has often been associated with one particular bouncy melody from a classic animated film. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, a recent premiere reminds us of the bassoon’s lyrical beauty.

On Sunday September 28, 2014, on WRTI, Daniel Matsukawa and The Philadelphia Orchestra perform David Ludwig’s Pictures from the Floating World.

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Creatively Speaking
6:33 am
Mon September 22, 2014

Composer David Ludwig's Legacy

David Ludwig

On this week's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on WRTI, we'll hear three new pieces, commissioned for Orchestra principle musicians. As WRTI's Jim Cotter reports, one of these works was written by a local composer with a long musical lineage.

 

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Creatively Speaking
6:30 am
Mon September 22, 2014

The Ney: An Ancient Flute Celebrated in a Modern Work

The flute is one of the oldest musical instruments, with its earliest versions found thousands of years ago in different cultures. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, a recently composed flute concerto celebrates one of its ancient bamboo ancestors.

On Sunday, September 28, 2014, on WRTI, Jeffrey Khaner and The Philadelphia Orchestra perform Behzad Ranjbaran’s Flute Concerto.

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Creatively Speaking
3:29 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

This Is Not Your Parents' Opera

The Philadelphia Opera Collective presents By You that Made Me Frankenstein at The Franklin Inn Club from September 12th through the 21st.

A group of young musical and theater artists are making the case that a great opera experience doesn’t depend on staging in a grand hall, with elaborate sets and costumes. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports,  Philadelphia Opera Collaborative is reaching out to new audiences presenting operas in small spaces, exclusively in English, showcasing how powerful, intimate, and accessible the art form can be.

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Creatively Speaking
3:24 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

A Queerly Cool Jazz Festival in Philadelphia

Composer, arranger, and pianist Billy Strayhorn was an openly gay black man living in New York City in the 1930s, which took much courage. His "Lush Life" explores that experience.

The William Way LGBT Community Center in Philadelphia first imagined the nation’s first LGBT Jazz Festival last year. And over the course of the year, the city, and the city’s jazz community - including the Philadelphia Jazz Project and Ars Nova Workshop - signed on.

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Creatively Speaking
11:55 am
Fri September 12, 2014

Shining a Light on Italian Composer, Pianist, and Conductor Alfredo Casella

Italian composer, pianist, and conductor Alfredo Casella (1883 - 1947)

Early 20th-century Italian composer, pianist, and conductor Alfredo Casella promoted music of his compatriots. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the 21st-century conductor Giandrea Noseda is shining a light on Casella’s lesser-known work.

Listen to a performance of Alfredo Casella's Barcarola e Scherzo for Flute and Piano, Op. 4 (1903):

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Creatively Speaking
11:08 am
Thu September 4, 2014

Poulenc's Aubade: A Still-Unique Choreographic Concerto

French composer Francis Poulenc (1899-1963)

In 1929, an unusual work by a versatile 20th-century French composer premiered at the home of his wealthy patrons. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, this piece, still unique in the classical repertoire, is part piano concerto and part ballet, in a chamber music setting.

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Creatively Speaking
6:02 am
Mon September 1, 2014

American Audiences Missing Out On Many Great Performers

Pianist Eric Le Sage

Over the past decade or so, it has become increasingly difficult for overseas musicians without well-established reputations in the U.S. to get permission to travel here for work. However, as WRTI's Jim Cotter reports, when a powerhouse such as The Philadelphia Orchestra wants a particular soloist, they usually get their man, or woman.

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