Creatively Speaking

Creatively Speaking
9:45 pm
Mon May 6, 2013

Yannick's Latest Recording: Hear It Here First!

If the classical recording market is supposedly global, why is a major Yannick Nezet-Seguin recording available seemingly everywhere but here? The Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns sent away to Japan for the conductor’s new Rotterdam Philharmonic recording - and wonders why.

Listen to an extended version of David Patrick Stearns' report on Yannick Nezet-Seguin's new recording of Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6

Where Music Lives
6:03 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Where Music Lives: On, And At, WRTI

Jazz vocalist Joanna Pascale

Music lives on - and at - WRTI, where throughout 2013 we're celebrating our 60th anniversary. "The Diamond Sessions” - a series of classical and jazz performances recorded live before audiences at the WRTI studios, are just a part of these celebrations. The first session featured jazz vocalist Joanna Pascale who told WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston that, for her, it all starts with the lyrics.

 

Joanna Pascale also teaches vocals in the jazz program at Temple University’s Boyer College of Music and Dance. In this excerpt, Pascale shares her insight on breaking down the lyrics to create meaning, as well as her favorite lyricists and writing on her own.


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Creatively Speaking
6:03 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Happy Birthday Tchaikovsky!

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840—1893)

This week we mark the birthday of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, who was born in Russia on May 7, 1840 and died suddenly at age 53. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the composer -  internationally renowned for his great melodies - was also a master of  technique and form. His body of work includes major works for the ballet, opera, and orchestra, as well as chamber music, concertos, sacred music, piano music, and solo songs.   

Learn more about Tchaikovsky’s life and music. Listen to Susan Lewis' interview with Jeffrey Kallberg, associate dean for arts and letters and professor of music history at the University of Pennsylvania.

Creatively Speaking
6:01 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Cellist David Finckel's Emerson Quartet Swan Song

Cellist David Finckel has been a member of the Emerson String Quartet for over 30 years. In that time, the ensemble has garnered a reputation as one of the world’s finest chamber ensembles. Now Finckel is leaving the group. But as WRTI’s Jim Cotter reports, it - and he - will endure.

Listen to Jim Cotter's full interview with Cellist David Finckel.

Creatively Speaking
6:00 am
Mon May 6, 2013

The Barnes Foundation Celebrates 1st And 90th Birthdays

Main gallery at the new Barnes Foundation location in Philadelphia.

This month, The Barnes Foundation is celebrating the first anniversary of its new home in Philadelphia.  As WRTI’s Jim Cotter reports, the Barnes is also part of worldwide celebrations of a landmark birthday for one of America’s greatest living artists.

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Creatively Speaking
6:05 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Jazz Vocalist Phyllis Chapell: Using Music to Promote Clean Water

Phyllis Chapell

A Philadelphia-area jazz singer, who interprets songs in many languages, is also drawing attention to environmental issues. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, Phyllis Chapell finds that music is a way to reach people on many levels.

Susan’s interview with Phylliss Chapell.

Information about Phyllis Chapell's upcoming live performances in the region.

The short film, AEIOU-Water, is shown Sundays at the Fairmount Water Works.   

Creatively Speaking
6:04 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Russian Choral Music: A Century Of Change

Russian choral music developed over centuries - informed by tradition, the state, the church, and eventually other parts of the world. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, this month, The Philadelphia Singers contrasts the works of two Russian masters, who created their sacred choral music over a century apart.

The Philadelphia Singers performs selections from Tchaikovsky’s 1878 Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, together with Alfred Schnittke's Choir Concerto, written in 1984-85, at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul in Center City, Philadelphia on Sunday April 28th. Information here.

Philadelphia Singers Assistant Conductor Brian Schkeeper discusses some of the core concepts behind these two Russian sacred works with WRTI's Susan Lewis.

Where Music Lives
6:02 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Jazz: Uniting Nations At The Woodmere Art Museum

Violet Oakley, 1874-1961, Dr. Herbert Vere Evatt (1894-1965), Delegate from Australia, from the United Nations Series, 1946, White conté on black paper
Woodmere Art Museum

Music Lives at the Woodmere Art Museum in Chestnut Hill, where, as WRTI's Jim Cotter reports, the role of jazz in the history of the United Nations is being celebrated - close to where the UN’s Headquarters might have been.

Take a look at the Promise Of Peace: Violet Oakley's United Nations Portraits at the Woodmere Art Museum.

Jim Cotter’s full interview with jazz bass player Warren Oree.

A United Nations Jazz Jam: Musicians from Around the World, April 26th, 6 to 8 pm at the Woodmere Art Museum. Performers include Yoomi Kwan (Korea, on cello); Rosie Langabeer (New Zealand), on accordion and piano); Atiba (Trinidad, on steel drums); Gloria Galante (Italy, on harp); Qin-Qian (China, on Erhu); Koki Soul (French Canadian, guitar/percussion/vocals); Phyllis Hadad (Brazil, on piano) and Moguane Mahloeoe (South Africa, on percussion).

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Creatively Speaking
6:01 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Beating The Drum For Solo Percussionists

Percussionist Colin Currie

One of the most recent instrumentalists to be added to the roster of soloists in orchestral performances is the percussionist. As WRTI’s Jim Cotter reports, it’s a role that makes unique demands.

In a program that also features works by Wagner and Tchaikovsky, Colin Currie performs Christopher Rouses' Der gerettete Alberich with The Philadelphia Orchestra here on WRTI on Sunday, April 21 at 2 pm.

Creatively Speaking
6:00 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Lyric Fest: Singing In Tongues

Lyric Fest’s co-founders Suzanne DuPlantis, Randi Marrazzo, and Laura Ward

Though better known today as a commercial brand, the Rosetta Stone is the artifact that most helped human kind in its understanding of ancient languages. As WRTI's Jim Cotter reports, a local music group is using the term to describe its exploration of great music written in non-native languages. Lyric Fest presents: The Rosetta Stone at the Academy of Vocal Arts on Sunday, May 5th at 3 pm.

Jim’s Cotter's full interview with Lyric Fest’s co-founders Suzanne DuPlantis, Randi Marrazzo and Laura Ward.

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