Creatively Speaking

Where Music Lives
6:21 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Where Music Lives: At WRTI!

Jazz vocalist Joanna Pascale

Music lives at WRTI, where throughout 2013 we're celebrating our 60th anniversary. "The Diamond Sessions” - a series of classical and jazz performances, recorded live before audiences at the WRTI studios, are just a part of these celebrations. The first session featured jazz vocalist Joanna Pascale who told WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston that, for her, it all starts with the lyrics.

Joanna Pascale also teaches vocals in the jazz program at Temple University’s Boyer College of Music and Dance. In this excerpt, Pascale shares her insight on breaking down the lyrics to create meaning, as well as her favorite lyricists and writing on her own.

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Creatively Speaking
7:30 am
Mon August 12, 2013

At Classical Concerts: A Whole Lot Of Coughing Going On!

Why do people cough during classical music concerts?  Is it a physical reflex or is there something else going on? WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston takes a look at some recent research

Hiccups and sneezes are not a standard accompaniment to a performance of classical music. But when was the last time a live performance was free of coughing? At a classical music concert, rules of etiquette demand silent immersion in the music - no cell phones or texting of course, no talking, and a limited array of acceptable responses to the performance.

Economics Professor Andreas Wagener, who specializes in social policy at Leibniz University of Hannover in Hannover, Germany, reviews the research and outlines six motives for why there’s more than the usual amount of coughing during classical concerts.

Professor Wagener is the author of Why Do People (Not) Cough in Concerts? The Economics of Concert Etiquette - published by the Association for Cultural Economics International.

Creatively Speaking
6:50 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Dave Conant's Hot Tips For The High Brow

Dave Conant

Throughout the month, Dave Conant is offering advice on how to get the most out of the arts. Take a listen!

Get To Know The Artist: The rewards of getting to personally know the artist behind the work.

Historical Societies: Some ways to experience history that’s close by or even right in your own neighborhood.

The Manicured Great Outdoors: The extraordinary wealth of municipal green spaces, stately gardens, and arboretums in our region.

Discounted Tickets: How you can enjoy a great night out, at a fraction of the full price.

Kids And The Arts: How you can help children, from toddlers to pre-teens, to better experience the visual and performing arts.

Volunteers: The very important role volunteers play in making the arts come alive.

Event Preparedness: The virtues of being a good arts Boy Scout or Girl Scout, and going to events prepared.

Indie Films: If you’ve become a little tired of contemporary cinema’s lack of imagination, here are some ideas on how you can still enjoy a great night at the movies.

  

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Creatively Speaking
6:46 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Remembering Wolfgang Sawallisch On The Podium

Wolfgang Sawallisch (1923—2013)

On this week's Philadelphia Orchestra In Concert broadcast, the Philadelphians pays special tribute to their former music director, Wolfgang Sawallisch, who died earlier this year. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, he’s remembered as a master on the podium.

 

Listen to reflections about Sawallisch playing chamber music and enjoying musical jokes from Philadelphia Orchestra musicians Davyd Booth, Gloria dePasquale, and Richard Harlow.
 


Listen to reflections about Conductor Laureate Wolfgang Sawallisch on the podium in Philadelphia, and on tour, from Philadelphia Orchestra musicians Kathryn Picht Read, Jonathan Beiler, and Mark Gigliotti.

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Creatively Speaking
7:08 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Opera In Unconventional Locales

Opera Philadelphia seemed to be itching for a break from the opera house with its pop-up performances at the Reading Terminal Market and Macy’s Center City. As The Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns reports, the company has announced formal plans to perform in even less predictable places.

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Creatively Speaking
7:24 am
Mon August 5, 2013

The Allure of Bach's Brandenburg Concertos

J. S. Bach (1685—1750)

Today, J. S. Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos are among the most popular pieces from the Baroque era. WRTI’s Susan Lewis explores the mystery in the story of the famous concertos.   

On Sunday, August 11th at 2 pm, WRTI will broadcast a recorded live concert featuring The Philadelphia Orchestra performing three of Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos, his Double Violin Concerto, and his Orchestral Suite No. 3.

Listen to Susan’s interview with Temple University Music Professor Steven Zohn about the mystery and ongoing appeal of Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos.

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Creatively Speaking
7:16 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Science Of Jazz: A Mapping App Merges Art And Technology

Dr. Youngmoo Kim, director of Drexel University’s Expressive & Creative Technologies Center (ExCITe)

A smartphone app developed at Drexel University deconstructs music into discernible elements like tone, intensity, and rhythm, and facilitates a fuller way of experiencing a live performance. Drexel University’s Expressive & Creative Technologies Center (ExCITe) uses the “Science of Jazz” app to translate some of what’s measurable about music into visual form.  

Microphones capture sound and the app transforms it to images in real time: one for how sound waves reach different parts of a concert hall, another to approximate which notes musicians are playing on their instruments, and another to depict the pitch and intensity of each instrument.

Dr. Youngmoo Kim, ExCITe’s director, is behind the app, which he says makes the live concert more educational and meaningful. Limited to the iPhone - and used only for jazz performances so far - see how it works: 


 

 Audio FileIn these excerpts of Meridee Duddleston’s interview with Dr. Kim he describes synergy between art and science and creates a word picture of how the “Science of Jazz” Iphone app works. It was first demonstrated during a jazz concert at the Philadelphia Science Festival in 2012 and was further refined for another concert in 2013.Edit | Remove

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Where Music Lives
6:47 am
Mon August 5, 2013

A Feast Of Summer Opera In Reading

Berks Opera Workshop will perform a concert version of Verdi's AIDA on Friday, August 9th.

Follow the Schuylkill west from Philadelphia - either the river or the expressway will do - and you’ll eventually arrive in Reading. The state’s fifth-largest city, John Philip Sousa spent his last days here, the Rabbit series by John Updike was set here, and, Reading once lent its name to a now-defunct railway company with a still well-known Philadelphia terminal.

Today, as WRTI's Jim Cotter reports, the city is best known for its outlet malls, its pagoda, and a wealth of regional cultural organizations including the Reading Symphony Orchestra. Music Lives in Reading.

Berks Opera Workshop will perform a concert version of Verdi's AIDA on Friday, August 9, 2013 at 7:30 pm at the Miller Center for the Arts at Reading Community College.

Jim Cotter speaks with Berks Opera founder/directors Francine and Tamara Black.

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Creatively Speaking
9:39 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

A New Opera Takes Novel Approach

Composer Michael Hersch

Philadelphia has produced its share of opera singers. But what about operas themselves? Conservatives might say we have quite enough of them already. Nonetheless, there are currently six operas in the making in our region - one, each, by Jennifer Higdon, Missy Mazzoli, and Melissa Dunphy, and two from Andrea Clearfield. But the Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns tracked down the one who crossed the finish line first - Havertown-based Michael Hersch - only to ask, is this really opera?

Michael Hersch's opera, On the Threshold of Winter, premieres next summer in New York by the Nunc new music ensemble.

Creatively Speaking
11:59 am
Tue July 30, 2013

On The Up And Up: The Chamber Orchestra Of Philadelphia's Recent Success Stories

Sir Dirk Brosse leading The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia.

After some uncertain times, the Philadelphia classical music scene is enjoying one of its brightest periods.  While most of this is a reflection of the resurgence of The Philadelphia Orchestra, the ensemble that shares its Kimmel Center home is also on the up and up, as WRTI's Jim Cotter reports.

Seen by many as the smaller sibling of the "Fabulous Philadelphians," The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia has been quietly growing and expanding in ways that are causing similar groups around the country to sit up and take notice. 

The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia' 2013-14 season opens on September 15th and 16th with a program conducted by Sir Dirk Brosse featuring works by Mendelssohn and Beethoven.  Full audio and video of the concert will be available online shortly thereafter.

Jim Cotter's interview with Peter Gistelinck, executive director of The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia.

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