Creatively Speaking

Creatively Speaking
7:31 am
Fri October 18, 2013

150 Celebrated News Photographs: The Pulitzer Winners On Display in Philadelphia

Slava Veder's BURST OF JOY, 1974 Pulitzer winner

The National Constitution Center's new exhibition includes many of the world's most celebrated journalistic photographs. WRTI's Jim Cotter reports.

The Pulitzer Prizes were originally established by a bequest from newspaper baron Joseph Pulitzer, a century ago, to recognize exceptional contributions to journalism and literature.  Prizes for music and photography were added in the early 1940s.

The Constitution Center's Capture the Moment: The Pulitzer Prize Photographs is a moving exposition of prize-winning images from the past 70 years.

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Creatively Speaking
2:34 pm
Wed October 16, 2013

Music (and Art) at the Museum: Art After 5 on Friday Nights

Sara Moyn, left, is producer of evening programs and curator of the popular music program ART AFTER 5, held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art every Friday night.

Philadelphia’s largest fine art museum - over the past decade - has also become one of the city’s premiere performing arts presenters. As WRTI’s Jim Cotter reports, it’s attracting widely diverse audiences.

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Where Music Lives
10:16 am
Wed October 16, 2013

Classical Music Lives In Wilmington, DE

Wilmington's Grand Opera House in one of the venues where you can hear the Delaware Symphony.

Music lives in Wilmington, where the Delaware Symphony Orchestra makes its home. As WRTI's Susan Lewis reports, the ensemble is now presenting symphonic works and chamber music in various venues in and around the city.

On Friday, October 25th and Sunday October 27th, the Delaware Symphony Orchestra is performing a program featuring the music of Rossini, Mozart, and Brahms at Archmere Academy in Claymont, Delaware.

 

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Creatively Speaking
12:58 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Jazz Is...Charlie Rice

Jazz drummer Charlie Rice

Steady work is a coveted and rare prize among many jazz musicians. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston visits a force in the local jazz scene who never had a problem getting gigs. Recognized by Mayor Michael Nutter for his enduring contribution to the city’s jazz scene,  jazz drummer Charlie Rice has been keeping the beat for more than 70 years and counting.

Information about Jazz Bridge concerts at Collingswood Community Center

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Creatively Speaking
11:21 am
Mon October 14, 2013

A Great Week For Classical Music In Philly!

Guest Conductor Madeline Church, 9, was the winner of the conducting competition before the pop-up concert in Verizon Hall.

David Patrick Stearns reports on how The Philadelphia Orchestra turned the cancellation of a high-profile concert in New York City, into a triumphant civic celebration in Philadelphia. This, just days after an enthusiastic, 5,000-strong crowd gathered on Independence Mall to witness Opera Philadelphia’s season-opening production.

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Creatively Speaking
11:55 am
Tue October 8, 2013

All About The Pines of Rome

Ottorino Resphigi (1879-1936)

Born in 1879, violinist, violist, conductor and composer Ottorino Respighi moved to Rome in 1913. He became internationally recognized for his trilogy of symphonic poems celebrating the fountains, pines, and festivals of the city. WRTI’s Susan Lewis considers The Pines of Rome.

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Creatively Speaking
9:42 pm
Sun October 6, 2013

Going Strong: Philadelphia Chamber Music Society

Emerson String Quartet

The Philadelphia Chamber Music Society (PCMS) has been feeding the growing musical appetites of music lovers for decades with increasing numbers of concerts. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, PCMS grew out of the celebrated Marlboro Music Festival in Vermont, where gifted classical musicians have been playing chamber music since 1951.

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Creatively Speaking
9:27 pm
Sun October 6, 2013

The Public Votes On PA's 10 Most Valuable Historical Artifacts

Passmore Williamson’s visitors’ book contains the signatures of Frederick Douglass and hundreds of notable supporters of the imprisoned activist, a hero of the abolitionist movement.

The term Endangered Artifacts is most associated with objects from ancient civilizations. Yet, in Pennsylvania - as WRTI’s Jim Cotter reports - there’s now a statewide effort to preserve some of the Commonwealth's own, most vulnerable, historical treasures.

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Creatively Speaking
8:54 pm
Sun October 6, 2013

The Business Behind The Music

In the early 1900s, royalties from sales of sheet music produced a steady source of income to composers and music publishers. But radio changed all that. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston sat down with a legal expert to learn how.

It was one thing to sit at a piano in a parlor and play a Stephan Foster tune from sheet music propped up on a music stand.  But a broadcast of music over the airwaves was a different thing entirely!  The advent of radio as a tool for entertainment set the music industry on its heels and brought about new interpretations of copyright law, just as the digital age has done. 

Listen to more of Meridee's interview with intellectual property lawyer, Gary Rosen.

MERIDEE DUDDLESTON: Collecting royalties from sales of sheet music could be controlled. But intellectual property lawyer Gary Rosen says making music available to everyone over the airwaves for free was as disruptive to the music industry as the Internet has been.  Back in the early 1900s, composers saw radio broadcasts as a threat to their creativity and livelihoods - a threat, Rosen emphasizes, that copyright law was designed to prevent.

GARY ROSEN:  Copyright is given, not as a gift to composers, but it’s meant to benefit the public by spurring creativity.

MUSIC: John Philip Sousa's The Washington Post
 
DUDDLESTON:  The music industry and popular composers like John Philip Sousa concluded that a radio broadcast was a public performance of their copyrighted works. They demanded that the radio industry begin to pay royalties. And they banded together to enforce their rights in a way that avoided a logistical nightmare.

ROSEN:  Their solution was to form this performing rights organization in which they pool their copyrights and then licensed them on what’s called a blanket basis.

DUDDLESTON: The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) was the first blanket licensing organization.  Rosen says blanket copyright licenses for radio have worked the way they were intended.

ROSEN: And the fact that a mechanism was formed to actually enforce that performance right and create an income stream for composers has had a tremendous impact on the quality and variety of American music – popular, jazz, classical.

Gary A. Rosen is the author of Unfair to Genius: The Strange and Litigious Career of Ira B. Arnstein

Creatively Speaking
8:50 pm
Sun October 6, 2013

Musicians Takin' It To The Streets

You don't have to go far to hear music in Philadelphia - sometimes it’s on the next street corner. A guy with an acoustic guitar plays folk/rap on Rittenhouse Square. People mailing their bills at the post office at 9th and Chestnut are treated to the sound of a vibraphone. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns looks at what Philadelphia has on the street, and what it could have.

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