Benjamin Britten

ENCORE!
2:11 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

A Benjamin Britten Celebration with the New York Philharmonic: March 30, 4 PM

Benjamin Britten (1913-1976)

Join us for the Britten centenary celebrated on this week's New York Philharmonic broadcast, with two of the composer's best-loved works: the Serenade for Tenor, Horn, and Strings, and the choral Spring Symphony, Britten's celebration of winter's passing to spring. Sunday, March 30, 4 to 6 pm on WRTI. Alan Gilbert conducts.

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Deceptive Cadence
9:06 pm
Sun November 24, 2013

Making Music To Be Useful, And For The Living

Peter Grimes, on June 17, 2013 in Aldeburgh, England." href="/post/making-music-be-useful-and-living" class="noexit lightbox">
A singer takes the stage during the first performance of "Grimes on the Beach," an outdoor production of Benjamin Britten's opera Peter Grimes, on June 17, 2013 in Aldeburgh, England.
Bethany Clarke Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 6:20 pm

Composer Benjamin Britten was born 100 years ago today, and the occasion is being marked by performances of his music around the world, from Carnegie Hall in New York to Memorial Hall in Tokyo.

Britten was a central figure of 20th-century classical music: He was a conductor, pianist and festival producer, as well as a composer. His best-known works include the opera Billy Budd, his War Requiem and The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra.

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Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection
3:41 pm
Sat October 5, 2013

1913: Popper, Butterworth, Britten, Lutosławski on Fleisher Discoveries

Witold Lutosławski

Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection broadcasts Saturday, October 5th, 5 to 6 pm. We enjoyed our 1813 bicentennial so much last month that we thought we’d move a little closer, to the centennial of 1913. In that year, cellist/composer David Popper died, Benjamin Britten and Witold Lutosławski first saw the light of day, and George Butterworth composed The Banks of Green Willow.

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