Arts Desk

If you missed any of our short Arts Desk features on the air, you can always find them right here, along with additional related content. Check out stories by WRTI arts reporters Meridee Duddleston, Susan Lewis,  Debra Lew Harder, and Maureen Malloy. Arts Desk and Arts News Submission Guidelines

Yannick's Connection With Anton Bruckner

Feb 28, 2013

On The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert - a new weekly radio series on WRTI - Music Director Yannick Nezet-Seguin takes to the podium to conduct a symphony by one of the composers who is closest to him.  WRTI’s Jim Cotter has more.


Gioachino Rossini was born the last day of February in 1792. WRTI's Susan Lewis looks at the life and legacy of this prolific and celebrated operatic composer whose memorable melodies endure today.

His name is Yannick Nezet-Seguin, but in a New York Times profile recently, he was nicknamed "Mighty Mouse" by the opera star Joyce DiDonato.

After all, he's been saving the day for the recently distressed Philadelphia Orchestra. And, as The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns reports, he hopes to continue to do so in the upcoming 2013-2014 season.


Philadelphia’s All-City Orchestra has brought together talented music students from city high schools for over 60 years,. Its alumni include musicians in orchestras around the country. Students are learning from some of the best in the business, starting with their director, Philadelphia Orchestra Principal Timpani Don Liuzzi.

The annual All-Philadelphia High School Music Festival takes place on Monday March 4th at the Kimmel Center. The Philadelphia Orchestra performs the Shostakovich 5th Symphony on March 1st. 


Remembering A Philadelphia-Born Opera Legend

Feb 24, 2013

This week, we celebrate the birthday of Marian Anderson. The opera superstar was born in Philadelphia in 1897. WRTI’s Jim Cotter says that though her voice had an ethereal quality, the late, great contralto was renowned for her humility and her humanity.

Steven Krull Photography

Band music includes marches, pop songs, and transcriptions of orchestral works. But over the last century more composers have written explicitly for winds. The Philadelphia Wind Symphony was founded, in part, to explore the variety and richness of the repertoire.

The Philadelphia Wind Symphony performs this Sunday afternoon, March 3rd, at the University of the Arts, in Center City, Philadelphia.  

Music lives at LaRose Jazz Club in the Germantown section of Philadelphia. That's where sax player and local jazz legend Tony Williams has a steady Monday night gig. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston spends time with Tony Williams - now in his 80s - and finds out how this mainstay of the Philadelphia jazz scene keeps it fresh today and pursues his vision for tomorrow.

An educator, musician and mentor, Williams has been part of the jazz scene in Philadelphia and beyond for decades. His passion for jazz comes through as he blows on the saxophone in his Mount Airy home. Williams' humble altruism has also spilled out into the neighborhood. In the late 1970s, he spearheaded the formation of a number of teen jazz bands, including “Pieces of a Dream,” and the “Stenton Diner Teenage Jazz Band,” made up of teenagers from Germantown and Mount Airy.  And for over 35 years his Mount Airy Cultural Center has built a bridge to the next generation  - through jazz.

Let us know Where Music Lives in your community! Add your ideas in the comments section here and check out our other Where Music Lives posts.

Yannick's Rite

Feb 22, 2013
Chris Lee

Music Director Yannick Nezet-Seguin would seem to be taking The Philadelphia Orchestra back to 1930. That was the year the late Leopold Stokowski, heard here with the Depression-era Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted Stravinsky’s ballet, The Rite of Spring when it was first danced in the United States. But there’s nothing retrogressive in what New York’s cutting-edge Ridge Theater is cooking up for this week’s Rite with the Orchestra. The Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns is still guessing what it will look like.

The least-used spaces in Verizon Hall are….up in the air.

STEARNS: There’s much height to it. There are projection surfaces above the orchestra. Why not make that a playing space for the choreography as well?

The Philadelphia Orchestra’s Vice President of Artistic Planning Jeremy Rothman is referring to the use of an aerialist. For that, he’s commandeering the hall for an entire week to set up the proper rigging. The production's winter-to-spring depiction will also have video projections on multiple screens and scrims, plus dancers. Though, not that many, says Nezet-Seguin.

NEZET-SEGUIN: There’s a few dancers but it’s not danced the whole thing, which was important for me.

Time and again, the conductor emphasizes that his orchestra is not going to get lost in a lot of theatrical bells and whistles. The huge Ridge Theater apparatus is there to serve the Orchestra. The conductor, not the dancers, will dictate tempos, says Rothman.

ROTHMAN:  Yannick is somewhat uncompromising about what he wants to present musically.

The Rite of Spring has been widely and wildly interpreted over the years, from tribal Russian dancers of the Joffrey Ballet to Paul Taylor’s film-noir version with gangsters. Just how far afield will this one go?  Is the ballet still about human sacrifice?

ROTHMAN: There is a sacrifice…the idea was to get back to the spirit of it…but rather than the …is to take the same spirit and update it with more modern means. But there’s still a sacrifice.

But there will NOT be blood when The Philadelphia Orchestra performs The Rite of Spring in a multi-media production at the Kimmel Center this week.
 

While many people still attend concerts in traditional halls, classical music is also being played in more informal settings - and in combination with different types of music. WRTI’s Susan Lewis investigates LiveConnections, which conducts programs at World Café Live in Philadelphia and Wilmington.

LEWIS: Hearing great music performed up close can be a life-changing experience. That’s the premise of LiveConnections, where Melinda Steffy is general manager.

STEFFY:  We focus a lot on collaborations with musicians across genres and try to push the boundaries of music, so it's both very compelling and very accessible for a diverse range of people.

A Bach prelude, for example, might be played straight, then again in a jazz style.

LEWIS: This philosophy drives three programs: Bridge Sessions, in partnership with other organizations,  presents interactive performances for adults with special needs and groups of students.  ClassicAlive is a concert series for the general public with classical music performed with other genres in an intimate setting. Curator Mary Javian says the concerts expand the boundaries of repertoire, collaboration, and atmosphere.

JAVIAN: We’re bringing classical musicians of a very high level into a club. Asking them to perform while  people might have a drink, or might have a meal. But what we find is that the audiences are extremely engaged, because they’re getting an experience they wouldn’t have otherwise.

LEWIS: A third program, Live Studio, aims to use state-of-the-art video technology to connect underserved populations who cannot make it to the venue.

Coming up on February 24th: ClassicAlive presents Project Trio - a trio of bass, cello, and flute influenced by classical music, hip hop, and jazz, along with musicians from Friends Select School. 

Music lives in Lancaster, Pa., at a theater that - over the course of its more than 160 years - has served as a vaudeville venue, a cinema, and today, a stage reserved for musical theater and plays. WRTI’s Jim Cotter takes us to a historic opera house…that has never really housed opera.

Since its opening in 1852, Fulton Opera House in Lancaster County has remained open – making it one of the oldest continuously operating theater buildings in the nation.  However, noted local playwright Barry Kornhauser, who also worked at the Fulton for over 30 years, says that despite its name it was never known as a place to hear your favorite arias. 

This was called an opera house in those days because theaters still had an iffy reputation.  “Opera House” sounded a little more impressive.  But it wasn’t strictly opera?  It was never really opera at all. That was tradition of the time.  People were railing against theater…so they thought, theater owners, that if they called the places opera houses, they could fool some of the people some of the time.

Now the building is better known to most as the Fulton Theater; a company that produces seven full productions and four family shows each season.  And despite the theater’s rich history, Managing Director Aaron Young says the company is committed to a contemporary mission.

We’re not a museum.  We honor what has been done in the past, but it’s all about, how do we move forward? How do we communicate with an audience now?  How do we remain relevant in an era that has a lot of different options for people’s leisure time?  We no longer have a monopoly like we did back in the 1800s when the theater was built.

In addition to their stage productions, the Fulton also engages in various community and accessibility programs.  Offering outreach to local schools, ASL Interpretation, Open Captioning, Audio Description, and our Assistive Listening devices for the hearing impaired, and their annual Pennsylvania High School theater Festival.  More than a century-and-a-half after it began, the Fulton Opera House continues to be a community focal point where theater blossoms and music lives.

The Ghosts Who Haunt The Fulton Opera House.

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