Arts & Culture

Creatively Speaking
11:02 am
Sat November 3, 2012

Who Is...Auguste Rodin?

Auguste Rodin: The Thinker

As Philadelphia’s Rodin Museum reopens, WRTI's Susan Lewis explores the life and work of the iconic French sculptor Auguste Rodin (1840-1917).

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Creatively Speaking
5:05 pm
Fri October 26, 2012

Notes On A Dry Country

As the National Constitution Center stages a major exhibition on Prohibition, WRTI's Susan Lewis looks at the early 20th-century ban on alcohol, and its consequences for American culture.

American Spirits: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition is at the National Constitution Center from October 19, 2012 to April 28, 2013.

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Creatively Speaking
11:05 am
Sat October 20, 2012

A Swan Song For A Prima Ballerina

Jim Cotter speaks with Pennsylvania Ballet Principal dancer Arantxa Ochoa.  After 16 years with the company, 11 of those in leading roles, Ochoa will retire from the stage after dancing the title role in Giselle, the ballet’s season-opening production.

Creatively Speaking
11:02 am
Sat October 13, 2012

At The Walnut Street Theatre: A Fresh Reworking Of An Iconic Love Story

The film Love Story was a massive cultural phenomenon in the early 1970s. Adapted by Erich Segal from his novel of the same name, the romantic tragedy starred Ryan O'Neal and Ali MacGraw as two students from different social classes who meet at Harvard, fall in love, and wed. After which, personal tragedy strikes.

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Creatively Speaking
11:01 am
Sat September 22, 2012

Shipwreck! Winslow Homer and THE LIFE LINE

The Life Line, 1884, Winslow Homer, American, Oil on canvas, 28 5/8 x 44 3/4 inches (72.7 x 113.7 cm) The George W. Elkins Collection, 1924, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Nineteenth and early 20th-century American artist Winslow Homer painted civil war scenes, landscapes, and seascapes, but his tour de force was a close up of a dramatic rescue at sea. 

The Life Line, part of the American art collection at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, is the focus of a new exhibition that explores the artistic foundation and historical events that set the stage for this groundbreaking work.

Critic-at-Large
1:00 pm
Thu September 20, 2012

Art Review: SHIPWRECK! Winslow Homer and 'The Life Line'

The Life Line, 1884, Winslow Homer, American, Oil on canvas, 28 5/8 x 44 3/4 inches (72.7 x 113.7 cm) The George W. Elkins Collection, 1924

WRTI's Lesley Valdes provides the back story of Winslow Homer's The Life Line, which is on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in a special exhibition that runs from September 22 - December 16, 2012.

Critic-At-Large
4:39 pm
Wed September 19, 2012

Theater Review: RED-EYE to HAVRE de GRACE

This avant-garde musical about the last days in the life of Edgar Allan Poe is reviewed by WRTI's Lesley Valdes. Presented in the 2012 Live Arts Festival. Directed by Thaddeus Phillips.

Arts & Culture
2:50 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

People’s Light and Theatre Company Presents August Wilson’s Iconic Play Seven Guitars

When playwright August Wilson died in 2005, The New York Times writer Ben Brantley compared his writing to "the sweep of Shakespearean music," his plays "like grand opera rooted in the blues." Wilson won a host of awards, including two Pulitzer Prizes;  his magnum opus, now known as the Pittsburgh cycle, includes 10 plays, each set in a different decade of the 20th century, chronicling the lives of ordinary African Americans.

Creatively Speaking
2:41 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

American Philosopical Society Adds Dance to Museum Exhibition

Benjamin Franklin’s many gifts to Philadelphia and the nation include free libraries, fire companies lightning rods, bi-focals, and the University of Pennsylvania. The American Philosophical Society, founded in 1743, is perhaps one of his lesser-known gems.


Despite the large statue of Franklin above the main entrance, many people may unknowingly walk right past the centuries-old Society, which is discreetly housed in a neo-classical building in Old City, Philadelphia.

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Creatively Speaking
9:58 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Walnut Street Theatre Presents a Fresh Reworking of an Iconic Love Story

The film Love Story was a massive cultural phenomenon in the early 1970s. Adapted by Erich Segal from his novel of the same name, the romantic tragedy starred Ryan O'Neal and Ali MacGraw as two students from different social classes who meet at Harvard, fall in love, and wed. After which, personal tragedy strikes.

Read more

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