Sunday Classical

Sunday, 5 to 6 pm

WRTI presents a variety of classical music programming every Sunday from 5 to 6 pm. On the third Sunday of each month, you'll hear APPLAUSE: The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia radio broadcast series. Host Dave Conant brings you the best from the Chamber Orchestra's recent performances and archive recording collection. On other Sundays, tune in to hear concerts from the Library of Congress radio broadcast series, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, Wolf Trap, and other special programming.

This Sunday on WRTI, July 3rd, at 1 pm, Yannick Nézet-Séguin is back on the podium for the final concert of The Philadelphia Orchestra’s 2015-16 season, joined by a Philadelphia favorite, the incomparable Lang Lang. He will perform the music of someone else whose career had close ties to Philadelphia, Sergei Rachmaninoff.

Rachmaninoff’s First Piano Concerto has never been as celebrated as his Second and Third, but as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, it has all the things we love about Rachmaninoff.
 

On Sunday, July 3rd, Lang Lang performs Rachmaninoff’s First Piano Concerto on The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI at 1 pm.

Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony highlights The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI this Sunday, June 26th at 1 pm, but there’s so much more. The Violin Concerto of John Williams and Ravel’s well-loved Pavane round out a brilliant program conducted by the Orchestra’s Principal Guest Conductor Stéphane Denève.

In his early twenties, Argentinian composer Alberto Ginastera (1916-1983) won the title "Argentina's Great Musical Hope" with works such as the ballet score Estancia, and popular piano pieces like Danzas argentinas, which strongly evoke the rhythm and flair of the folk music of Argentina.

This Sunday on WRTI, it's a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from late April at Verizon Hall with Conductor-in-Residence Cristian Măcelaru on the podium. The program begins with Sergei Prokofiev’s sparkling First Symphony, completed the summer before Russian revolutionary upheavals led to his departure from his native country for nearly two decades.

John Williams, so famous for his award-winning film scores including Jaws, Star Wars, and Schindler’s List, wrote a violin concerto that transcends the personal story behind it. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

When Samuel Barber’s violin concerto was rejected by the man for whom it was commissioned in 1939, he turned to his alma mater — The Curtis Institute of Music — where the concerto was performed to acclaim, leading to its official premiere with The Philadelphia Orchestra. WRTI’s Susan Lewis talked to a panel of artists about Barber’s legacy, and the pleasures and perils of creating and performing new work in Philadelphia.


Salman Rushdie's 'Shalimar The Clown' Is Now An Opera

Jun 11, 2016

Shalimar the Clown is Salman Rushdie's eighth novel. Published in 2005, it tells the story of a young man who seeks revenge after he's jilted by the love of his life. There's intrigue, violence, and conflict between tradition and modern society — the sort of stuff that makes for grand opera.

Now, Shalimar the Clown is just that. Adapted by composer Jack Perla and Pulitzer Prize-nominated playwright Rajiv Joseph, the opera premieres tonight at Opera Theatre of Saint Louis.

Rushdie says the novel sprang from one tragic image.

Classical music on WRTI’s Memorial Day Weekend looks back and moves forward! Of course we'll have American and other classical favorites all weekend long as we remember the meaning of Memorial Day. But we’ll also hear new works of remembrance.

Vahan Stepanyan

Michael Tilson Thomas, music director of the San Francisco Symphony and artistic director of the New World Symphony, is on the podium for this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast from 1 to 3 pm on WRTI.

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