Saturday Classics

Saturday, 6 to 11 am

Wake up to a great variety of classical music every Saturday morning with host Rolf Charlston. You'll hear works ranging from Baroque to contemporary--from a gentle waltz to a bright tango--from old favorites to something new.

Composer ID: 
53c7dc13e1c8b9c77b4b9b7c|53c7dbe1e1c8b9c77b4b9b6e

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Crossover
8:44 am
Sat October 25, 2014

Finding New Ways to Engage Classical Music Audiences

Stephen Gunzenhauser is music director of the Lancaster Symphony Orchestra

Two of our favorite guests return to Crossover this week. In their own ways they create classical concert experiences...but they endeavor to take it further than that.

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The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI
1:23 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

The Philadelphians in Concert on WRTI: Bruckner, Barber, Bartok, & Batiashvili, Oct. 26, 1 PM

Georgian violinist Lisa Batiashvili

This Sunday at 1 pm, from a Philadelphia Orchestra concert this past May at Verizon Hall, Yannick is on the podium to conduct Barber’s Adagio for Strings, an ethereal meditation that has emerged as an iconic piece of 20th-century American music; Bartok’s First Violin Concerto, played by Lisa Batiashvili, one of the world’s most sought-after violinists; and the concert will conclude with that imposing orchestral cathedral of sound known as Bruckner’s Symphony No.

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Crossover
10:52 am
Sat October 18, 2014

Manfred Honeck + Pittsburgh = No More Big Five

Conductor Manfred Honeck

Once upon a time, in the world of classical music, there lived the "Big Five." The term was used to lump together the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Cleveland Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic and our own Philadelphia Orchestra as the finest performing orchestras in the U.S.

But, over time, as other orchestras gained stature, both in performance and finances, the term became passe and no longer indicative of the American orchestral scene.

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WRTI Picks from NPR Music
4:05 pm
Fri October 17, 2014

Twenty Years Later, 'Klinghoffer' Still Draws Protests

Several hundred protesters picket the opening night of the Metropolitan Opera season at Lincoln Center, Sept. 22, 2014. "You will be made to destroy that set," Jeffrey Wiesenfeld said.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 6:26 pm

The Metropolitan Opera in New York is bracing for one of the more controversial productions in its history. Since its first performance more than 20 years ago, some critics have charged that composer John Adams' The Death of Klinghoffer is anti-Israel, and even anti-Semitic. But the opera's supporters dispute that. They argue that Klinghoffer is a dramatic masterpiece that deserves to make its Met debut on Monday.

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Verdi, Beethoven, and Brosse
11:09 am
Fri October 17, 2014

Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony: Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia on WRTI, Oct. 19, 4 PM

Maestro Dirk Brosse

Join us an hour earlier than usual this Sunday for our monthly broadcast of the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia. Music Director Dirk Brossé leads a program that includes one of his own works, the World War I-inspired Terra Incognita.  The major work on the program is Beethoven's "Pastoral."

Join host Dave Conant, Sunday, October 19, 4 to 5 pm.

Program:

Verdi: La Traviata: Prelude to Act III

Brossé: Terra Incognita

Beethoven: Symphony No. 6, "Pastoral"

The Fabulous Philadelphians on WRTI
12:21 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

It's All Mozart on Sunday's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert Broadcast on WRTI!

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

Join us this Sunday, October 19th at 1 pm to hear the first concert from last April's Philadelphia Orchestra Mozart Celebration, which brings us three Mozart masterpieces! With Yannick on the podium, the Orchestra will play an overture to one of Mozart's three operas set to a libretto by Lorenzo Da Ponte, Cosi fan Tutte, and then continue with the Piano Concerto No.

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Academy of Vocal Arts on WRTI
12:39 pm
Mon October 13, 2014

Vote for Your Favorite Singer! The AVA Giargiari Bel Canto Competition on WRTI, Oct. 12, 4 PM

Tenor Dominick Chenes

You have spoken!  You voted for the WRTI audience favorite from the 35th annual Academy of Vocal Arts Giargiari Bel Canto Competition. And the winners are:

WRTI Audience Favorites:
1st Place: Tenor Dominick Chenes
2nd Place: Soprano Anush Avetisyan
3rd Place: Bass-baritone Daniel Noyola

Live Competition Winners:
1st Place: Bass-baritone André Courville
2nd Place Tenor Dominick Chenes / Baritone Jorge Espino (tie)
Audience Favorite: Tenor Dominick Chenes

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The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI
11:24 am
Fri October 10, 2014

A Feast for Organ and Brass: The Philadelphians on WRTI, Oct. 12th, 1 PM

Conductor Alain Altinoglu

What a program! It's a re-broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI, Sunday, October 12th at 1 pm. The Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ and organist Michael Stairs are two of the biggest stars in a firmament of many! Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin had to withdraw from this performance in March, but it brought conductor Alain Altinoglu to Verizon Hall at Yannick’s recommendation, and was he ever in his element!

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San Francisco Opera on WRTI
1:46 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

The Chilling Opera, DOLORES CLAIBORNE, on WRTI: October 11, 1 PM

Soprano Patricia Racette sings Dolores, and bass-baritone Wayne Tigges sings Joe St. George.

The San Francisco Opera presents a world premiere! Desperate. Passionate. Trapped. Dolores Claiborne is willing to do whatever it takes to save herself and her daughter—even if that means taking a life. One of the most compelling characters to emerge from the imagination of Stephen King, the feisty Maine housekeeper is a natural fit for opera—and specifically for the dark theatricality of American composer Tobias Picker.

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Creatively Speaking
11:13 am
Mon October 6, 2014

Finding New Dimensions in Chamber Music

Dolce Suono's repertoire spans a range of works from Baroque to contemporary, for two to 11 musicians, with various combinations of instruments.

Chamber music, played by small ensembles, one player to a part, and without a conductor, is an intimate and engaging art form. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, it can also provide insight into history and human emotions.  

For flutist and music historian Mimi Stillman, chamber music is a way to explore important issues "that illuminate how people thought at a given time."

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