Saturday Classics

Saturday, 6 am to 12 noon

Wake up to a great variety of classical music every Saturday morning with host Rolf Charlston. You'll hear works ranging from Baroque to contemporary - from a gentle waltz to a bright tango - from old favorites to something new.

Dario Acosta

Vladimir Jurowski, one of the most sought-after conductors in the world, collaborates with one of the world’s most talented virtuoso pianists, Yefim Bronfman, in Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5, the “Emperor,” one of the supreme achievements in the genre — this Sunday, April 17th at 1 pm on The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on WRTI.

How does a lifelong interest in the choral works of J.S. Bach maintain a luster that continues to this day? World-renowned German conductor, scholar, and teacher Helmuth Rilling gives WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston some insight.


Guest conductor Andrés Orozco-Estrada is on the podium, and Augustin Hadelich is soloist, for this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast of a performance from this past February at Verizon Hall.

A young conductor, trained in both his native Colombia and Vienna, now leads orchestras on two continents. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, culture, intellect and passion are all part of his approach to music.

Listen to The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI on Sunday, April 10th at 1 pm to hear Andres Orozco-Estrada lead the Orchestra in a program featuring the music of Barber, Brahms, and Dvorak.  The concert was recorded live at Verizon Hall this past February. The broadcast can be heard on 90.1 FM in Philadelphia and streaming online at WRTI.org.

Few of The Philadelphia Orchestra's guest conductors were as great or as quirky as Otto Klemperer, whose recordings from his 1962 concerts with the ensemble have recently been remastered. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns discovered that the conductor is hardly forgotten.  

Three richly orchestrated works on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast complete the series of concerts from January celebrating the music of Vienna.

Editor's note on April 4, 2016: You may have figured this out already — this story was an April Fools' joke. It's not real. We hope you enjoyed it.

On Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday, April 2nd, 5 to 6 pm. After World War I, there was a trail of American composers to Paris to study with Nadia Boulanger. But in the years after the Civil War, early in American orchestral music, composers also went to Europe to study. Mostly, they went to Germany, and some of those, to Munich, at that time the second-greatest center of music in Europe, after Paris. After all, so many of the operas of the trend-setting Richard Wagner had premiered in this capital of Bavaria, and it was not all that far from Bayreuth, with its theater specially built for Wagner.

Austrian composer Anton Webern became famous as a member of the "Second Viennese School," known for writing atonal music. But, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, an early work - officially premiered decades after Webern’s death - shows another side to the 20th-century modernist.


In our jobs, when we're told to redo something, it usually means we've made a mistake. That's not the case for Javier Camarena. Earlier this month at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, the tenor had the chance to retake an aria during a performance of Donizetti's Don Pasquale because the audience went bonkers after the first time he sang it.

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