Saturday Classics

Saturday, 6 to 11 am

Wake up to a great variety of classical music every Saturday morning with host Rolf Charlston. You'll hear works ranging from Baroque to contemporary--from a gentle waltz to a bright tango--from old favorites to something new.

Thanks to her open heart and determination, Cinderella triumphs over her mean-spirited relatives in Rossini’s sparkling version of the story. Karine Deshayes, lauded for her "emotional depth and vibrant, beautiful sound" (The New York Times), makes her San Francisco Opera debut in the beloved fairy tale about a gentle but courageous servant girl who catches the eye of a handsome prince.

We hope you enjoyed our annual broadcast of the Academy of Vocal Arts Giargiari Bel Canto Competition on Saturday. The votes are in! And the winners are...

Deana Martin and her band will take you on a musical journey honoring her legendary father Dean Martin and other great performers who, along with Frank Sinatra, shaped American music and pop culture for more than four decades.

When can music composed for a film stand on its own? WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports on how John Williams’ suite from Close Encounters of the Third Kind translates to the concert stage.

He won two Pulitzer Prizes; taught composers as disparate as Leonard Bernstein, Elliott Carter, and Leroy Anderson; and his books on harmony, counterpoint, and orchestration continue to be used by composers today. On Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday Oct. 3rd, 5 to 6 pm.

Ron Berard/Metropolitan Opera

The Metropolitan Opera changed the face of theatergoing nearly a decade ago with  high-definition simulcasts in movie theaters using a technology associated more with rock concerts and boxing matches than opera. What has the competition done to companies such as Opera Philadelphia? The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns talks to both sides.

The Yellow River Piano Concerto, performed by The Philadelphia Orchestra during its historic trip to China in 1973, has become a part of the Western symphonic repertoire since its premiere in 1969 during China's Cultural Revolution. What is less well known in this country is the story of the cantata that led to the concerto.

On September 22nd, the most well-known song in the English language was freed for use by all. Commercial enterprises will no longer be required to pay licensing fees or risk fines for violating the copyright claim of music publisher Warner/Chappell.  As of this writing, it’s unknown if Warner will continue to fight the case filed two years ago. Stay tuned.

Symphony in C’s new music director grew up in Bulgaria, studied in Paris, and has lived on both coasts of the U.S. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, he brings enthusiasm and a wealth of experience learning from some of today’s most masterful conductors.

Listen to a broadcast of Stilian Kirov leading Symphony in C on WRTI: Sunday October 4th at 3 pm, in a program featuring music by Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky, as well as a new work by Patrick O’Malley, the 2015 Winner of the Symphony’s Young Composers' Competition. Alexander Kobrin, pianist.