Saturday Classics

Saturday, 6 am to 12 noon

Wake up to a great variety of classical music every Saturday morning with host Rolf Charlston. You'll hear works ranging from Baroque to contemporary - from a gentle waltz to a bright tango - from old favorites to something new.

Join us this Sunday, July 10th from 4 to 6 pm to hear The Crossing recorded live in concert on June 24, 2016 at the Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral. Philadelphia’s professional choir dedicated to new music, The Crossing presents its most ambitious project ever with Seven Responses.

From its mesmerizing ebb and flow and the purity of the choristers' blend alone, you'd be forgiven for thinking this might be one of Henryk Górecki's many sacred choral works. There's a palpable air of serenity and reflection. But instead, it's a song about a little pony and a blue-eyed girl.

Join us on Sunday, July 10th from 1 to 3 pm for a re-broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra's first concert of the 2015/2016 season. If you coudn't make it to Verizon Hall back in the fall of last year, listen to Yannick Nézet-Séguin lead the Philadelphians in works by Rachmaninoff, Ravel, and Rimsky-Korsakov with pianist Daniil Trifonov on WRTI.

The Smithsonian Institution

The national melody that’s notoriously hard to sing owes its musical roots to a private men’s club. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston hears the “the bombs bursting in air” anew.

Philadelphia can expect symphonic fireworks over the Fourth of July weekend when the Kimmel Center hosts the first performance by the National Youth Orchestra 2 on Saturday. NYO2 was formed by Carnegie Hall’s educational arm and is coached by members of The Philadelphia Orchestra. But catching any of the musicians between classes and rehearsals wasn’t easy for the Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns.

In a special re-broadcast this Sunday at 5 pm on WRTI, Peter Richard Conte, host of our Wanamaker Organ Hour, performs on and emcees the Wanamaker Organ Day program, which originally aired June 4th.

On Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday, July 2nd, 5-6 pm.... Recently on Discoveries we’ve been looking at the beginning generations of American composers of orchestral music. In the last decades of the 19th century they began making their way to Europe—mostly to Germany—to study their craft, which they then brought back. MacDowell, Chadwick, Parker, Paine, and others are prime examples of this pilgrimage. Their legacy remains to this day, through their music and their students.

July 4th Weekend on WRTI: Classical from A to Z!

Jun 27, 2016

It’s classical from A to Z all July 4th weekend on WRTI! Beginning Friday at noon and continuing right through Independence Day itself, Monday July the 4th, we’ll keep your weekend humming with composers from A to Z.

The second movement of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7—the Allegretto—has captivated listeners since the symphony’s 1813 premiere, when it was so popular that the orchestra used it as an encore. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on why this particular movement continues to engages us.

In his early twenties, Argentinian composer Alberto Ginastera (1916-1983) won the title "Argentina's Great Musical Hope" with works such as the ballet score Estancia, and popular piano pieces like Danzas argentinas, which strongly evoke the rhythm and flair of the folk music of Argentina.

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