Saturday Classics

Saturday, 6 to 11 am

Wake up to a great variety of classical music every Saturday morning with host Rolf Charlston. You'll hear works ranging from Baroque to contemporary--from a gentle waltz to a bright tango--from old favorites to something new.

Donald Nally conducts The Crossing in the first of three concerts, comprising their Seventh Annual Month of Moderns Festival. This performance, "Only memory of forgetting," features the premiere of Joel Puckett's I enter the earth, which sets the words of a !Kung shaman describing the dance trance of a healing ritual. The choir is joined by Laura Ward on piano and Michael Jones on trumpet.

It's been said that when you hear the vocal group Anonymous 4 perform, you're listening to the music of angels or something that can't possibly come from our world. In a word, unearthly. Unfortunately, that sound won't be around much longer, as the group has decided to retire their angelic vocal cords with the 2015-2016 season.  

In the first part of the 20th century, live music accompanied the otherwise silent movies. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, today, concerts that pair projections of popular films, such as The Lord of the Rings, with live performances of their scores, showcase the music and the imagery in a whole new light.

In the giddy, glitzy world of the Roaring Twenties, a naive young man falls head over heels for a glamorous party girl. Together they trade the fast life for an idyllic love nest far from the city…until an unexpected visitor threatens to tear them apart. It's one of opera’s greatest romances, La Traviata on WRTI, July 18, 1 to 3:30 pm. James Conlon conducts.

Nino Machaidze sings Violetta, with Arturo Chacón-Cruz as her handsome Alfredo. The incomparable Plácido Domingo sings the role of the father determined to do the right thing.

A caprice may be deeper than we think on Now Is the Time, Saturday, July 18th at 9 pm. Jeremy Gill’s just-released Capriccio with the Parker String Quartet is, at first glance, a series of technical exercises. But the pizzicatos, slides, duets, trios, and sound-painting are only the vehicles for deep music-making. We have time on the show for most, but not all of, Capriccio, and it’s an exhilarating ride.

The Orchestra's 115th season began last September with the initiation of the 40/40 Project, a broadening of the ensemble’s repertoire that featured 40 works not performed on subscription concerts in at least the last 40 years (or ever), in honor of Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s 40th birthday. Philadelphia audiences were asked to vote through electronic and social media, and three favorites were chosen to open the three respective concerts at the end of September.

Join us for an intense performance by Lisa Batiashvili of Shostakovich's Violin Concerto No. 1 with The Philadelphia Orchestra under Yannick Nezet-Seguin. This was the centerpiece of the last concert of the 2014/2015 season and a program the Orchestra took on its European tour, which was a stunning success.

There's a whole world of music out there that, for the most part, goes in one ear and out the other. But if it weren't there, the world probably wouldn't sound as good. We're talking about "production music." Music used to create a mood or feeling without being the foreground element in a production.

Rome in the year 1800 is a deadly place for dissidents. The painter Cavaradossi risks everything to shelter his comrade; but his lover, the fiery Tosca, keeps playing cat and mouse with the lustful and sadistic Baron Scarpia, the chief of police. If Cavaradossi is condemned, will Tosca trade her honor to save him?  Listen to the final performance from Lyric Opera of Chicago's 2015 broadcast season, Puccini's TOSCA, Saturday, July 11th, 1 to 4 pm on WRTI.

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