Saturday Classics

Saturday, 6 am to 12 noon

Treat yourself to a delightful variety of classical music every Saturday morning with host Debra Lew Harder. You'll hear works encompassing a wide range of time periods and instrumentation— from the Renaissance to new American classical music—from a gentle waltz to a bright piano sonata—from old favorites to something new.

Despite being a Polish Jew, 17-year-old aspiring composer Joseph Beer won admission in 1925 to the prestigious Hochschule fur Musik in Vienna, which had a quota for both Jews and Poles. He was also allowed to skip the first four years of the curriculum to study composition in master classes, and went on to graduate with highest honors.

It was 1930, two years before Hitler became chancellor of Germany.

Cut the WRTI Spring Member Drive in Half!

Apr 23, 2017

We’ve never done this before. Our goal for the upcoming Spring Member Drive is to raise all the money in half the time. We can do that only if your goal is to contribute nowbefore the drive begins on May 1st. Simply put, All the Members in Half the Time equals more music and fewer interruptions. Just the way you like it.

This Sunday, April 23rd, WRTI’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast brings us Mozart and Brahms, featuring pianist Garrick Ohlsson. Herbert Blomstedt, who turns 90 this season, is on the podium and returns to Verizon Hall to celebrate the 30th anniversary of his Philadelphia Orchestra debut.

What Is a Fugue?

Apr 16, 2017

You don’t need to know anything about classical music to love it. But a deeper understanding of its rich history and context can add something special to your listening experience. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston takes us on this short flight of the fugue, which reached the height of its popularity in the Baroque period.

Thomas Lloyd has directed the choirs at Haverford and Bryn Mawr Colleges in the suburbs of Philadelphia for over two decades. While teaching his students a wide range of repertoire, his focus has been to show—firsthand—what music means in other parts of the world.

Credit: Chris Lee

Join us on Easter Sunday to hear the Philadelphia Orchestra conclude its chronological survey of Brahms’ magisterial four symphonies with a performance of his Symphony No. 4, on WRTI’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast from 1 to 3 pm.

Life awaits its birth this Saturday before Easter on Now Is the Time, Saturday, April 15th at 9 pm on WRTI.org and WRTI-HD2. Evan Chambers walks through a graveyard and is inspired by inscriptions and poetry in the Introduction to The Old Burying Ground and its last section, Paths of Peace. Then, an empty building in a Memphis night wonders if the sun will ever return, in Abandoned, a monodrama by Kamran Ince.

WRTI has teamed up with The Philadelphia Orchestra and the Mann Center for the Performing Arts to present the 2017 People's Choice Concert. Join us at the Mann on Wednesday, July 26th when the Philadelphia Orchestra plays a program selected by YOU!

The springtime Jewish holiday of Passover is about liberation from slavery in ancient Egypt. Join us on Saturday from 11:30 am to 12:30 pm as violinist Itzhak Perlman shares Passover music from many traditions, plus songs and memories from his childhood in Israel. The program draws its shape from the Passover seder and, like that ancient family ritual, the music gets progressively more gleeful as the show moves along.

While Easter has inspired Bach's Saint Matthew Passion and many other beloved classical works, the holiday of Passover—which is being celebrated by millions of the Jewish faith this week—claims no famous pieces in the concert repertoire. WRTI's Debra Lew Harder explores why.

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