The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert

Sunday, 1 to 3 pm

Join us on Sunday afternoons to hear our very own Philadelphia Orchestra in live, recorded concerts from Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center.

The ensemble has a long and venerable history of radio broadcasts, as the first orchestra with its own commercially sponsored national radio series, beginning in 1929 on NBC. This weekly series of radio broadcasts marks the return of the Orchestra to the airwaves. WRTI's Gregg Whiteside is producer and host. 

Information about broadcast on Sunday, October 2 at 1 pm

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Ways to Connect

Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony highlights The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI this Sunday, June 26th at 1 pm, but there’s so much more. The Violin Concerto of John Williams and Ravel’s well-loved Pavane round out a brilliant program conducted by the Orchestra’s Principal Guest Conductor Stéphane Denève.

In his early twenties, Argentinian composer Alberto Ginastera (1916-1983) won the title "Argentina's Great Musical Hope" with works such as the ballet score Estancia, and popular piano pieces like Danzas argentinas, which strongly evoke the rhythm and flair of the folk music of Argentina.

This Sunday on WRTI, it's a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from late April at Verizon Hall with Conductor-in-Residence Cristian Măcelaru on the podium. The program begins with Sergei Prokofiev’s sparkling First Symphony, completed the summer before Russian revolutionary upheavals led to his departure from his native country for nearly two decades.

Join us this Sunday, from 1 to 3 pm, for a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from mid April that brings us two Philadelphia Orchestra commissions – Maurice Wright’s Resounding Drums, a timpani concerto composed for the Orchestra’s principal timpanist, Don Liuzzi, and the Clarinet Concerto by Jonathan Leshnoff, composed for the principal clarinetist of the Philadelphians, Ricardo Morales.

Join us for an intense performance of Shostakovich's Violin Concerto No. 1 by Lisa Batiashvili with The Philadelphia Orchestra under Yannick Nezet-Seguin. This was the centerpiece of the last concert of the 2014/2015 season and a program the Orchestra took on its European tour, which was a stunning success.


Twentieth-century Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich composed much of his work under the shadow of political oppression. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, today, his music and his personal story continue to inspire a new generation.


Austrian composer Anton Webern became famous as a member of the "Second Viennese School," known for writing atonal music. But, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, an early work—officially premiered decades after Webern’s death—shows another side to the 20th-century modernist.


All three of the works on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast were composed in Paris within a five-year period (1928-33), one by a German, another by a Frenchman, and the last by an American. And they all marvelously combine elements of serious composition with popular influences, notably from jazz.

Twentieth-century German composer Kurt Weill’s popular music for theater eventually overshadowed his orchestral and classical work. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on his second symphony, and why it was not heard for decades.


History will be made when The Philadelphia Orchestra kicks off its 2016 Asia Tour with two concerts at the Hong Kong Cultural Centre. And you'll be right there! WRTI's Gregg Whiteside is traveling across the globe to China to bring you both performances live, in real time, on WRTI. Tune in at 90.1 FM in Philadelphia, or listen online at WRTI.org.

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