The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert

Sunday, 1 to 3 pm on WRTI-FM; Monday, 7 to 9 pm on Classical Stream

Join us on Sunday afternoons and Monday evenings to hear the Philadelphia Orchestra in live, recorded concerts from Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center.

The ensemble has a long and venerable history of radio broadcasts, as the first orchestra with its own commercially sponsored national radio series, beginning in 1929 on NBC. This weekly series of radio broadcasts marks the return of the Orchestra to the airwaves. WRTI's Gregg Whiteside is producer and host.

Information about the broadcast on Sunday, October 8th at 1 pm

Information about the broadcast on Sunday, October 15th at 1 pm

Listen on the WRTI mobile App! Get it here.

Keep the music playing! Support WRTI with a tax-deductible contribution here.

Ways to Connect

Jan Regan/Philadelphia Orchestra

On the stage of China's National Centre for the Performing Arts in Beijing—just a month ago—Yannick Nézet-Séguin, stood before his Philadelphia Orchestra and spoke to an audience that included sponsors, patrons, musicians, diplomats, Chinese government officials and business leaders, as well as delegations from Philadelphia and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Jessica Griffin


On Tuesday, June 20th, Allison Vulgamore announced she will be stepping down as President and CEO of the Philadelphia Orchestra when her contract expires in December, 2017. WRTI’s Debra Lew Harder spoke with her the next day about her biggest achievements as well as the biggest challenges she faced during her tenure with the Orchestra, which began in 2010.

Join us for a re-broadcast of a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from 2016 that brings us two Philadelphia Orchestra commissions—Maurice Wright’s Resounding Drums, a timpani concerto composed for the Orchestra’s principal timpanist Don Liuzzi, and the Clarinet Concerto by Jonathan Leshnoff, composed for the principal clarinetist of the Philadelphians, Ricardo Morales.

In his early twenties, Argentinian composer Alberto Ginastera (1916-1983) won the title "Argentina's Great Musical Hope" with works such as the ballet score Estancia, and popular piano pieces like Danzas argentinas, which strongly evoke the rhythm and flair of the folk music of Argentina.

Jan Regan / Philadelphia Orchestra

The Philadelphia Orchestra is back from its debut in Mongolia, where planned full-orchestra concerts needed to be canceled due to a nation-wide financial crisis. Instead, a contingent of 18 musicians spent two days in the capital city of Ulaanbaatar. Now, the Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns asks what this could lead to.

It's a special three-hour Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast, on Sunday at 1 pm and Monday night at 7 pm on HD-2, capturing highlights of the Orchestra’s three-day Rachmaninoff Festival at the end of April.

Sergei Rachmaninoff was so distressed by the negative reaction to the 1897 premiere of his first symphony, he stopped composing for nearly three years. What restored his confidence to compose his much-loved Piano Concerto No.2? WRTI’s Susan Lewis has the story.

If you missed the broadcast on Sunday, June 11th, listen on Monday night at 7 pm! WRTI’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast begins and ends with works by Finnish masters and is conducted by Principal Guest Conductor Stéphane Denève. And in between? Pianist Lars Vogt plays one of Grieg's most popular works.

Edvard Grieg was just 24 when he wrote his only completed piano concerto in 1868. It's one of his greatest works, and launched his international career. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.
 


Special rebroadcast! The Philadelphia Orchestra, in Asia this week, has been doing quite of bit of traveling on its own, and on Monday, June 5th at 7 pm on HD-2 and WRTI.org, WRTI will turn back the clock and rebroadcast this Vienna Festival concert, previously aired on March 20th of last year. It was a memorable performance, conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, of two symphonies composed roughly 80 years apart: Joseph Haydn’s 103rd, the famous “Drumroll” Symphony, and Anton Bruckner’s 4th.

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