The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert

Sunday, 1 to 3 pm

Join us on Sunday afternoons to hear our very own Philadelphia Orchestra in live, recorded concerts from Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center.

The ensemble has a long and venerable history of radio broadcasts, as the first orchestra with its own commercially sponsored national radio series, beginning in 1929 on NBC. This weekly series of radio broadcasts marks the return of the Orchestra to the airwaves. WRTI's Gregg Whiteside is producer and host. 

Program information for broadcast on Sunday, May 22nd

LIVE Broadcasts of The Philadelphia Orchestra in Hong Kong! May 19th & 20th at 8 AM on WRTI

Keep the music playing! Support WRTI with a tax-deductible contribution here.

Ways to Connect

The symphony as we know it today underwent major changes from the end of the 18th to the late 19th century. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, two symphonies from two composers in Vienna during that time illustrate the range of the form.
 


It was on the 2nd of March, 100 years ago, that The Philadelphia Orchestra was, in effect, introduced to the world. The stage of the Academy of Music had to be extended, at considerable expense, to accommodate the enormous vocal and orchestral forces for the first United States performance of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 8, the so-called “Symphony of a Thousand.”

A thriving classical music world involves not only composers and performers, but those who listen, and those who manage, connect, and promote the artists and the art form. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on Musical America, a publication that has been celebrating and connecting classical musicians since 1898:


Mat Hennek

Quite a few classical composers have found artistic inspiration in one of the planet’s most important natural resources. WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports on pianist Helene Grimaud's new recording of a collection of works reflecting on...water.


Mathias Botho

Join us to hear the first concert in The Philadelphia Orchestra’s "Music of Vienna" series, recorded live this past January at Verizon Hall. Pianist Jan Lisiecki, an audience favorite at only 20 years old, will be the soloist in Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4.

Mention the music of Vienna, and some of us automatically think of a waltz.  But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the city was a musical magnet for composers, especially from the late 18th century through the 19th and beyond.


Georgia Bertazzi

This Sunday's Philadelphia Orchestra broadcast is an all-Russian program that brings to the podium Grammy and ECHO Klassik Award-winning Italian conductor Fabio Luisi, who serves as general music director of the Zurich Opera and principal conductor of the Metropolitan Opera, where he was expected to succeed James Levine as Music Director there. But with the announcement of his new appointment as principal conductor of the Danish National Symphony in the 2017-18 season, he has effectively stepped down at the Met.

A leading contemporary conductor explores both music, and – in his free time – fragrances.  As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, Fabio Luisi sees many connections between music and perfume.


Michael Patrick O’Leary

Violinist Hilary Hahn returns to The Philadelphia Orchestra to perform the Fourth Violin Concerto of the Belgian composer and violinist Henri Vieuxtemps, on The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast Sunday, February 21st, at 1 pm. This concerto is a favorite of Ms. Hahn’s; Vieuxtemps composed it while he was serving as violinist to Tsar Nicholas I in St. Petersburg.


Does a song, or even a symphony, trigger memories of important moments and milestones in your life? For violinist Hillary Hahn, a little-known, 19th-century concerto is an important part of her history and her current repertoire.


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