The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert

Sunday, 1 to 3 pm

Join us on Sunday afternoons to hear our very own "Fabulous Philadelphians" in live, recorded concerts from Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center.

The Philadelphia Orchestra has a long and venerable history of radio broadcasts, as the first orchestra with its own commercially sponsored national radio series, beginning in 1929 on NBC. This weekly series of radio broadcasts marks the return of the Orchestra to the airwaves. WRTI's Gregg Whiteside is producer and host. 

Program information for broadcast on February 14 at 1 pm

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Ways to Connect

Scottish conductor Donald Runnicles is busy with leadership positions in the opera and symphonic worlds in Germany, Scotland, and America.  WRTI’s  Susan Lewis profiles Runnicles, who is also a regular guest conductor with The Philadelphia Orchestra.  


Stephen Hahn

It’s just after 1:00 in the afternoon, and I’m holding up a wall backstage at the Kimmel Center, after watching a Philadelphia Orchestra rehearsal with Music Director Yannick Nezet-Seguin and soloist Hilary Hahn. Musicians are heading out, the hall is emptying.

Luke Ratray

Join us on Sunday, December 6th at 1 PM for The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert. This week, you'll hear a performance of Bela Bartok’s Violin Concerto No. 2, infused with the dance rhythms of Hungarian folklore, and played by the multi award-winning violinist Gil Shaham.


Hulton archive

After publicly resisting the growing fascism in Europe in the 1930s, Hungarian pianist and composer Bela Bartok eventually fled his homeland. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, he wrote his Second Violin Concerto not long before emigrating to the United States.


Finnish composer Jean Sibelius (1865-1957) was so revered in his homeland that the government commissioned him to write a symphony as part of a national celebration of his 50th birthday. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on what has become one of the composer’s most famous works.


Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 4 is not very well known in America. But it has a strong connection with The Philadelphia Orchestra, which continues to mine the richness of the work. WRTI's Susan Lewis has more.


According to Middle Eastern legend, Scheherazade saved her own life by telling her husband, the Sultan,  folk tales for A Thousand and One Nights. Those stories-within a-story inspired 19th-century composer Rimsky-Korsakov to create an orchestral suite that remains one of his most popular works today.  WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

Join us on Sunday, November 29th at 1 pm, as WRTI’s fourth year of Philadelphia Orchestra In Concert broadcasts kicks off. And if there is a theme to this whole season it will be the inimitable “Philadelphia Sound” that has inspired composers through the years, and led to many world and U.S. premieres.

In the late 19th century, prominent composers began to emerge from countries that had not been center stage in international musical life. Among these leading figures were Jean Sibelius in Finland, and Antonín Dvořák and Leoš Janáček in the Czech lands.

Moravian composer Leos Janacek, who died in 1928 at the age of 74, wrote many of his most highly regarded works in the last dozen years of his life. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, his monumental Mass is striking in its structure, size, rhythms, and tone, not to mention its use of an ancient text.

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