The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert

Sunday, 1 to 3 pm

Join us on Sunday afternoons to hear our very own "Fabulous Philadelphians" in live, recorded concerts from Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center.

The Philadelphia Orchestra has a long and venerable history of radio broadcasts, as the first orchestra with its own commercially sponsored national radio series, beginning in 1929 on NBC. This weekly series of radio broadcasts marks the return of the Orchestra to the airwaves. WRTI's Gregg Whiteside is producer and host. 

Program information for broadcast on October 11 at 1 pm

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This is a must-hear re-broadcast for all of our organ music enthusiasts! It's The Philadelphia Orchestra's All-Organ Weekend from last November - a mini-festival, of sorts, that represents the culmination of a month-long celebration of the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ at Verizon Hall. Yannick Nezet-Seguin conducts.

The symphonic organ had its heyday in the first half of the 20th century, when organists frequently transcribed and played works written for orchestra. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, that practice is now coming back into musical fashion.

What became known as the "Resurrection" Symphony, Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 2 is one of the longest, most ambitious, and profoundly moving orchestral works ever composed; its unusual impact and philosophical import have been recognized ever since Mahler conducted the premiere in Berlin in 1895.

The composer Gustav Mahler once said, “A symphony must be like the world. It must contain everything.” If that is so, then Mahler’s second symphony, the “Resurrection,” is bigger, even, than that. 

Mahler had already tackled big questions in an orchestral work, called Funeral Rites. He played it on the piano for Hans von Bülow, and the conductor said that it made Wagner's Tristan und Isolde sound like Haydn. Mahler turned Funeral Rites into the first movement of his Resurrection symphony.

The tickets are gone for tonight's Philadelphia Orchestra Free Neighborhood Concert at Verizon Hall. But if you aren't one of the lucky ticket holders, you can still hear the concert LIVE via webcast at 6:30 PM EST at

Listen to Yannick Nezet-Seguin conduct The Philadelphia Orchestra in a concert from October, 2014 at Verizon Hall. During this re-broadcast, you'll hear works by two Russian masters - Alexander Glazunov and Sergei Rachmaninoff - composed within a few years of one another at the end of the 19th century.

Although Russian pianist, composer and conductor Sergei Rachmaninoff became an international star, his first symphony was considered a failure when it premiered in 1897, and was not performed again during the composer’s lifetime. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, today it’s regarded much differently. 

On Sunday, July 25th at 1 pm on WRTI, listen to a re-broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra performing Rachmaninoff's Symphony No. 1 in 2014.

The Orchestra's 115th season began last September with the initiation of the 40/40 Project, a broadening of the ensemble’s repertoire that featured 40 works not performed on subscription concerts in at least the last 40 years (or ever), in honor of Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s 40th birthday. Philadelphia audiences were asked to vote through electronic and social media, and three favorites were chosen to open the three respective concerts at the end of September.

Richard Strauss’ Alpine Symphony is, on one level, a musical description of nature. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the accessible music belies a greater meaning.

Based on a boyhood experience getting caught in a storm hiking in the Alps, the idea for An Alpine Symphony germinated for years in Strauss’s mind.  It wasn’t until after Gustav Mahler died, that he determined to finish the work, which he regarded as a tribute to his fellow composer.

Join us for an intense performance by Lisa Batiashvili of Shostakovich's Violin Concerto No. 1 with The Philadelphia Orchestra under Yannick Nezet-Seguin. This was the centerpiece of the last concert of the 2014/2015 season and a program the Orchestra took on its European tour, which was a stunning success.