The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert

Sunday, 1 to 3 pm on WRTI-FM; Monday, 7 to 9 pm on Classical Stream

Join us on Sunday afternoons and Monday evenings to hear the Philadelphia Orchestra in live, recorded concerts from Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center.

The ensemble has a long and venerable history of radio broadcasts, as the first orchestra with its own commercially sponsored national radio series, beginning in 1929 on NBC. This weekly series of radio broadcasts marks the return of the Orchestra to the airwaves. WRTI's Gregg Whiteside is producer and host.

Information about the broadcast on Sunday, October 15th at 1 pm

Information about the broadcast on Sunday, October 22nd at 1 pm

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Ways to Connect

Credit: Elias

Week Two of the Philadelphia Orchestra’s Paris Festival on WRTI 90.1 offers a different aspect to a program featuring music-making in the City of Light: non-French composers who moved to Paris, and decided to stay.

A Philadelphia Orchestra musician has gained a national audience for a hobby that’s not based on sound. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston has more.


Credit: Rob Shanahan

The trumpet was the instrument of kings, in court and on the battlefield. Today the orchestral trumpet is an instrument for virtuosos, and used for a variety of purposes. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

C'est magnifique! The Philadelphia Orchestra’s three-week Paris Festival from earlier this year is on WRTI starting Sunday, September 3rd at 1 pm!  Six French composers, in works conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, are featured in Week One: Chabrier, Fauré, Saint-Saëns, Canteloube, Ravel and Florent Schmitt.

Credit: Jessica Griffin

The largest, lowest non-brass woodwind instrument in the orchestra evokes darkness, romance, humor, and joy. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more about the contrabassoon.

Yannick Nézet-Séguin, credit: Jan Regan

Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts this Sunday's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on WRTI 90.1. It's a program comprising two major works of the 20th century: Sergei Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 2, played by one of the most talented virtuoso pianists in the world today, Yefim Bronfman; and Dmitri Shostakovich’s bold and powerful Symphony No. 4.

Austrian composer Anton Webern became famous as a member of the "Second Viennese School," known for writing atonal music. But, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, an early work—officially premiered decades after Webern’s death—shows another side to the 20th-century modernist.

Twentieth-century Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich composed much of his work under the shadow of political oppression. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, today, his music and his personal story continue to inspire a new generation.


Credit: Jessica Griffin

Paul Jacobs, the only organist ever to have won a Grammy Award, will perform in all three works on our Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast this coming Sunday, August 20th at 1 pm.

The Mystery of Music as an Art Form

Aug 13, 2017
Credit: Jeff Herman

Music can be mysterious, even to those who spend their lives creating it. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, composer Christopher Rouse ponders the profound power of music with his concerto for organ and orchestra.

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