The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert

Sunday, 1 to 3 pm on WRTI-FM; Monday, 7 to 9 pm on Classical Stream

Join us on Sunday afternoons and Monday evenings to hear the Philadelphia Orchestra in live, recorded concerts from Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center.

The ensemble has a long and venerable history of radio broadcasts, as the first orchestra with its own commercially sponsored national radio series, beginning in 1929 on NBC. This weekly series of radio broadcasts marks the return of the Orchestra to the airwaves. WRTI's Gregg Whiteside is producer and host.

Information about broadcast on January 7th at 1 pm

Information about the broadcast on January 14th at 1 pm

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The Philadelphia Museum of Art is a proud sponsor of The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcasts on WRTI 90.1. Old Masters Now: Celebrating the Johnson Collection is on view through February 19, 2018

Ways to Connect

This week Hilary Hahn plays Bernstein in a live broadcast on WRTI. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, it’s all part of a season-long celebration of the Renaissance man who influenced so many, including Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin.

What a concert we have in store for you in this Sunday's broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra!  The celebrated violinist Gil Shaham is soloist and brings you all the passion, energy, and virtuoso fireworks of Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in D Major.

This Sunday, November 26th at 1 pm on WRTI 90.1, Philadelphia Orchestra Principal Guest Conductor, Stéphane Denève conducts one of the most remarkable first symphonies in music history— Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 1.

Jennifer Higdon’s concerto, On a Wire, was inspired by images of birds, as well as the innovative versatility of the musicians of Eighth Blackbird, the contemporary soloist ensemble. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

Steak sizzling on a grill at Pat's King of Steaks. A chorus of birdsong at the Philadelphia Zoo. These are just a few of the hundreds of sounds composer Tod Machover is collecting from people who live here for a unique musical profile to be performed by The Philadelphia Orchestra in April.

In correspondence with a patron, Tchaikovsky confessed he was grappling with the idea of fate in his Symphony No. 4. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the composer tried to make sense of his world with music that still resonates today. Listen to her conversation with Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin.

Jan Regan/Philadelphia Orchestra

On the stage of China's National Centre for the Performing Arts in Beijing—just a few months ago—Yannick Nézet-Séguin stood before his Philadelphia Orchestra and spoke to an audience that included sponsors, patrons, musicians, diplomats, Chinese government officials and business leaders, as well as delegations from Philadelphia and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

It's a special three-hour Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast, on Sunday at 1 pm, capturing highlights of the Orchestra’s three-day Rachmaninoff Festival from last April.

Sergei Rachmaninoff was so distressed by the negative reaction to the 1897 premiere of his first symphony, he stopped composing for nearly three years. What restored his confidence to compose his much-loved Piano Concerto No.2? WRTI’s Susan Lewis has the story.

Is it purely luck that determines our fortune in life? Carl Orff’s grand choral extravaganza, based on medieval poetry, Carmina Burana would seem to lead us to think so!

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