The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert

Sunday, 1 to 3 pm

Join us on Sunday afternoons to hear our very own Philadelphia Orchestra in live, recorded concerts from Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center.

The ensemble has a long and venerable history of radio broadcasts, as the first orchestra with its own commercially sponsored national radio series, beginning in 1929 on NBC. This weekly series of radio broadcasts marks the return of the Orchestra to the airwaves. WRTI's Gregg Whiteside is producer and host. 

Information about broadcast on December 11th at 1 pm

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Ways to Connect

Credit: Benjamin Ealovega

Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony highlights The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast on WRTI this Sunday, November 6th at 1 pm , but there’s so much more. The Violin Concerto of John Williams and Ravel’s well-loved Pavane round out a brilliant program conducted by the Orchestra’s Principal Guest Conductor Stéphane Denève .

This Sunday on WRTI, it's a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from last April at Verizon Hall with Conductor-in-Residence Cristian Măcelaru on the podium. The program begins with Sergei Prokofiev’ s sparkling First Symphony , completed the summer before Russian revolutionary upheavals led to his departure from his native country for nearly two decades.

In his early twenties, Argentinian composer Alberto Ginastera (1916-1983) won the title "Argentina's Great Musical Hope" with works such as the ballet score Estancia , and popular piano pieces like Danzas argentinas , which strongly evoke the rhythm and flair of the folk music of Argentina.

Join us this Sunday for a re-broadcast of a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from last April, that brings us two Philadelphia Orchestra commissions — Maurice Wright’s Resounding Drums , a timpani concerto composed for the Orchestra’s principal timpanist, Don Liuzzi, and the Clarinet Concerto by Jonathan Leshnoff , composed for the principal clarinetist of the Philadelphians, Ricardo Morales.

All three of the works on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast were composed in Paris within a five-year period (1928-33), one by a German, another by a Frenchman, and the last by an American. And they all marvelously combine elements of serious composition with popular influences, notably from jazz.

It's not often that one harpsichord is heard in concert with orchestra, let alone two ! WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on C.P.E. Bach’s Concerto for Two Harpsichords in F major , and two soloists who champion it.

CAMILE SCHELSTRAETE

Conductor, harpsichordist, and early music specialist Ton Koopman conducts The Philadelphia Orchestra in this Sunday’s re-broadcast at 1 pm. It's a Verizon Hall concert from this past March, during which Koopman teams with his wife, harpsichordist Tini Mathot , in a performance of C.P.E. Bach’s Concerto for Two Harpsichords , a boldly experimental work by a composer well-known for his innovation and dynamism.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) didn't play the flute, and once suggested he didn't even like it. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, he went on to write music that makes the instrument sing...and dance!

This week’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast brings us a performance from early March, which saw the return to Philadelphia of pianist Hélène Grimaud , who performs a concerto close to her heart, the Brahms Piano Concerto No. 2

Credit: Jessica Griffin/Philadelphia Orchestra

His Excellency President Elbegdorj — the leader of the growing democracy situated between China and Russia — spent last Friday, September 23rd in Philadelphia, following the conclusion of his work at the United Nations General Assembly in New York.

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