Opera on WRTI

Saturday, 1 to 5 pm

Saturday is always opera day at WRTI! We bring you top performances from some of the finest opera companies in the world, every week of the year.

You'll hear the full season from The Metropolitan Opera, and performances from the Academy of Vocal Arts, Lyric Opera of Chicago, LA Opera, San Francisco Opera, and more.

Coming up...

Saturday, October 10, 1 to 4 pm
San Francisco Opera
Gioacchino Rossini: CINDERELLA

Saturday, October 17, 1 to 3:30 pm
San Francisco Opera
Giacomo Puccini: LA BOHEME

Contribute here to support opera on WRTI throughout the year!

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Before Richard Strauss, before Richard Wagner, more than Hansel and Gretel, and even more than Mozart, the most German opera is, and always will be, Der Freischütz by Carl Maria von Weber.

The Freeshooter or The Marksman tells the story of Max, a man so in love with Agatha that he sells his soul—almost. To win her hand he must first win a shooting match, accepting an offer for magic bullets, bullets that cannot miss. They are forged in the deep forest by Samiel, the personification of Evil.

Even if you’re not familiar with the Broadway musical Carousel, you’re likely to have heard the uplifting message and melody of the song "You’ll Never Walk Alone."

Its roots in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical extend far beyond the story of love and loss. 

Todd Rosenberg

Get ready to hear some of the most beloved songs in musical theater - presented by one of the most beloved opera companies in America - "June is Bustin' Out All Over," "If I Loved You," You'll Never Walk Alone," and more! Saturday, June 13, 1 to 4 pm on WRTI.

Swaggering, carefree carnival barker, Billy Bigelow, captivates and marries the naive millworker, Julie Jordan. But all too soon, they fall on hard times and unbearable loss. Yet the power of love perseveres, as do the tuneful hits in Rodgers and Hammerstein's Carousel!

The Metropolitan Opera

We're very sad to report that longtime Metropolitan Opera Radio Host Margaret Juntwait died this morning, June 3rd. Below is a statement just released by the Met Opera:

The Metropolitan Opera mourns the death of our radio host Margaret Juntwait, who passed away this morning after a long battle with ovarian cancer. For millions of listeners around the world, Margaret was the voice of the Met for the past decade.

The troubadour Manrico and Count di Luna are bitter enemies. But in a twist of fate, they're both in love with Leonora — and they're brothers without knowing it.

Emotions boil in an action-packed story that includes babies switched at birth, kidnapping, mistaken identity, poisoning, civil strife, witches burned at the stake, and a noblewoman who offers herself to a man she hates, to save the man she loves.

The beautiful Countess has a difficult choice to make - will it be the amorous poet or the ardent musician whom she ultimately decides to love? She's one of the most glamorous and gifted singers of all time, he's one of the world's finest conductors — and both of them are supreme interpreters of Strauss. Renée Fleming and Sir Andrew Davis make magic in Richard Strauss' CAPRICCIO, Saturday, May 23, 1 to 4 pm on WRTI.

He's selfish. He's arrogant. He’s dangerous. With a list of conquests as long as the phonebook, Don Giovanni travels the world, snaring princesses and peasant girls alike. Thousands succumb, leaving a path of dishonor and broken lives. When the Don forces himself on the virtuous Donna Anna, her father intervenes and loses his life. Has the Don finally gone too far?

A new opera tells the compelling story of an American jazz icon in a way that broadens and diversifies opera’s audience. Opera Philadelphia is in the midst of preparing for the world premiere of Charlie Parker’s YARDBIRD.  The role of Parker was composed by Daniel Schnyder with tenor Lawrence Brownlee in mind.

Marty Sohl

The 2014-15 Metropolitan Opera Radio Broadcast season concludes with a broadcast of a 20th-century masterpiece, Igor Stravinsky’s only full-length opera, The Rake’s Progress.

It’s an English opera composed in Hollywood by a Russian. Igor Stravinsky saw the paintings and engravings by the 18th-century William Hogarth, depicting the consequences of loose living and licentiousness, centered on the fictional Tom Rakewell.

The English W. H. Auden and the American Chester Kallman then created a libretto that introduced a new character, Nick Shadow—the Devil—who entices Tom with promises of happiness and money. Tom loses everything, and ends up, literally, in Bedlam, the insane asylum, with the faithful Anne Trulove by his side.