Jazz Through the Night

Weeknights and Sunday, midnight to 6 am; Saturday, 2 to 6 am
  • Hosted by Courtney Blue, Tim Johnstone, heard on FM / HD1 and the jazz stream
  • Local Host Courtney Blue, Tim Johnstone, Ross Amico

Early-morning hosts spin classics and new releases from our jazz library.

April 2, 2018. Pianist Keith Jarrett, bassist Gary Peacock, and drummer Jack DeJohnette have made music together for over 40 years.  The sole exception was a two-year hiatus in the ‘90s when Jarrett’s health issues intervened. After the Fall (Live), recorded in 1998, immortalizes their first live performance after that pause and, well, let’s just say that for these guys, it was like getting back on a bike.

It's too cold! It’s too hot! It’s really kind of feverish. Listen to a jazz riot of emotions. Here are 10 spring standouts curated by Jazz Director Maureen Malloy. Each, in no special order, has inspired hundreds of interpretations.

When Johann Sebastian Bach compiled the first book of the Well-Tempered Clavier in 1722, he wrote that the 24 preludes and fugues were "for the profit and use of musical youth desirous of learning, and especially for the pastime of those already skilled in this study."

March 19, 2018. Guitarist John Hart, Hammond organist Adam Scone and drummer Rudy Albin Petschauer got together to record an album that doesn’t seem like it should make sense —until you realize the idea couldn’t be more perfect. The quintessentially American organ trio plays British pop music in a traditional way  on their new release, Leading the British Invasion.

Week of February 26, 2018. Puerto de Buenos Aires 1933: El Eco With Guillermo Nojechowicz. In his latest album, Argentine-born drummer and composer Guillermo Nojechowicz creates an expansive soundscape inspired his grandmother’s journey from Warsaw to Buenos Aires to escape rising anti-Semitism.

Miles Ahead is the name of an album and a film, and also where Miles Davis falls in the Countdown. He's your No. 2 Most Essential Jazz Artist this year.

If you “Take Five” to listen to music “In Your Own Sweet Way,” then let’s call a Time Out and just say that you’re thinking of Dave Brubeck. Enough of you did to vote him your No. 3 Most Essential Jazz Artist.

Don’t let that big smile fool you into thinking that Satchmo was only an entertainer. He was the most important pioneer in jazz. He basically re-invented trumpet playing. He was hugely popular in five decades and over many periods in jazz. With playing, singing, and even acting, Louis was the international ambassador for the American art form of jazz.

Even in a musical genre built on distinctive personality—jazz—the sound of Trane soars above. His tenor saxophone was unlike anything anyone had ever heard, then or since, and you voted him your No. 5 Most Essential Jazz Artist.

There are not enough letter O's in smooth when you’re talking about the Duke. Ellington was elegance personified. This band leader was refined in everything—from how he dressed, to his compositions, to his playing, to his connection with audiences. But no matter how smooth his manner or refined his looks, it all came down to one thing—“It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing).” And boy, did Ellington swing.

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