Jazz Through the Night

Weeknights and Sunday, midnight to 6 am; Saturday, 2 to 6 am
  • Hosted by Courtney Blue, Tim Johnstone, heard on FM / HD1 and the jazz stream
  • Local Host Courtney Blue, Tim Johnstone, Ross Amico

Early-morning hosts spin classics and new releases from our jazz library.

Classical and Jazz Weekend Highlights on WRTI

May 20, 2016

Turn on your radio, or go online, to hear the best classical music and jazz programs throughout the weekend. Here are some highlights...

Deneka Peniston

The virtuosity of the legendary Miles Davis speaks through another trumpeter who follows him in tune and time. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston talks with the musician behind the sound in the newly released biopic, Miles Ahead.

For a musician, the words “sanctuary,” “retreat,” and “haven” suggest attractive possibilities for creative expression. The Jazz Residency Program at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts isn’t based on the isolation these places evoke, but it does provide an environment conducive to a creative stream. The program is aimed at local jazz artists who can write music.

George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue is performed by orchestras everywhere. But not everyone has heard the original jazz band version, composed for a 1924 experimental concert that blurred the boundaries between jazz and classical music. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.


William P. Gottlieb

To celebrate Jazz Appreciation Month, we asked members of the jazz and arts community to tell us what jazz tune they would like to listen to right now. 

Pioneering bassist and composer Jymie Merritt was born in Philadelphia in 1926. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, he made a name for himself nationally but also founded a groundbreaking Philadelphia-based band that continues to inspire today’s generation of jazz artists.

NPR’s Jazz Night in America honored Jymie Merritt with a special concert this past January at World Cafe Live. The concert will air on WRTI, Sunday, April 10th at 8 pm. Watch video here!

Born To Be Blue: Chet Baker In 5 Songs

Mar 25, 2016

The vocal virtuosity of one of the last century’s jazz giants lives on through those who came after her, scores of albums, and now a U.S. Postal Service stamp. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston and Bob Perkins consider the late, great Sarah Vaughan.

Acoustic smashing has become one of singer Jacqui Naylor’s signature styles. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on Naylor, who learned jazz standards at her parents player piano. 


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