Jazz Through the Day

Monday through Saturday, 6 am to 6 pm
  • Hosted by heard on HD-2 and the jazz stream

Join us for an exploration of the American treasure we all know as jazz - great sounds from great artists, featuring music by the masters as well as those who are new on the scene.

No tricks...we plan on bringing you nothing but musical treats this Halloween! Tune in starting at 6 pm on Saturday, October 31st as Jeff Duperon kicks off an evening of sweet and savory jazz. Have you ever noticed how many tunes reference food, or even have food in the title?  Jeff will showcase these fun songs throughout the evening, and the delicious jazz morsels will continue with Tim Johnstone after midnight, until it's time for breakfast.

Jazz Vocalist Mark Murphy Dies at 83

Oct 23, 2015

Vocalist Mark Murphy, a six-time Grammy nominee known for his improvisational skill and ability to interpret a wide range of song material, died yesterday, October 22, at the Lillian Booth Actors Home in Englewood, N.J. The cause of death was not reported, but it is known that Murphy, who was 83, had been ill for some time. Read more of the article from Jazz Times.

The New Cool of Bob James & Nathan East

Oct 21, 2015

Pianist, composer, producer, and godfather of smooth jazz, Bob James has achieved spectacular success as a solo artist and de facto leader of the supergroup, Fourplay. He’s also an accomplished collaborator—his discography includes many award-winning albums with Earl Klugh, David Sanborn, Kirk Whalum, and Korean guitarist Jack Lee.

Tigran Hamasyan won the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Piano Competition in 2006, but the music that resonates even deeper for him is centuries removed — and a sound world away — from jazz.

Two Englishmen, Guy Wood and Robert Mellin, slipped it into the Great American Songbook just before it closed, just as rock rolled over sophistication. It begins from below, a slowly twisting Roman candle of a tune, and explodes in the top range of the singer, as the eyes of onlookers reflect the glory of what songs once were.


There's no one person responsible for creating music festivals — or for making them such a huge part of how we witness live performances today. But starting in 1954, one person developed a recipe for their secret sauce.

George Wein still goes to his signature event every year, checking out performances and greeting the artists. These days, he does it on a golf cart which drives him between stages — he's about to turn 90, after all — but he says he takes his job as producer very seriously.

Guitarist and composer John Scofield's 2015 album is called Past Present. And that's what it is: four jazz musicians very much in the moment, looking back at events that informed the music they're playing—and listening back to a sound three of them created some 20 years ago.

Witnessing certain events, and meeting certain people earlier in life, can sometimes become meaningful as time goes by—especially when the witness goes on to become a writer, historian, or otherwise chronicler of life’s personalities and events.