Jazz Through the Day

Monday through Saturday, 6 am to 6 pm
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Join us for an exploration of the American treasure we all know as jazz - great sounds from great artists, featuring music by the masters as well as those who are new on the scene.

WRTI's Essential Jazz Artist No. 4: Dave Brubeck

Feb 7, 2017

If you “Take Five” to listen to music “In Your Own Sweet Way,” then let’s call a Time Out and just say that you’re thinking of Dave Brubeck. Enough of you did to vote him your No. 4 Most Essential Jazz Artist.

Even in a musical genre built on distinctive personality—jazz—the sound of Trane soars above. His tenor saxophone was unlike anything anyone had ever heard, then or since, and you voted him your No. 5 Most Essential Jazz Artist.

Get the WRTI App!

Feb 3, 2017

Big news! You can now enjoy WRTI in a whole new way with the first-ever WRTI App! Download it today to listen to WRTI in the background while browsing the web or catching up on your emails. Your favorite radio station will always be with you—on your mobile phone or tablet—even when you're traveling!

There are not enough letter O's in smooth when you’re talking about the Duke. Ellington was elegance personified. This band leader was refined in everything—from how he dressed, to his compositions, to his playing, to his connection with audiences. But no matter how smooth his manner or refined his looks, it all came down to one thing—“It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing).” And boy did Ellington swing.

Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie have been credited with changing the face of jazz in the mid 1940s. They kicked it up a notch, and ushered in an era known as "modern jazz"—which some dubbed "bebop."


Charlie Parker, Credit: William Gottlieb

Yesterday’s No. 9 was Count Basie, and he influenced a kid from Kansas City who became the fastest, cleanest operator of an alto saxophone through the remote harmonies of bop that followed Big Band’s heyday. “Yardbird” or “Bird,” he was Charlie Parker. You voted this phoenix-like talent the No. 8 Most Essential Jazz Artist.

WRTI's Essential Jazz Artist No. 9: Count Basie

Jan 31, 2017

If it’s refined and sophisticated, but it’s jumping and swinging and striding all at the same time, you’re talking Count Basie, and you voted William James Basie the No. 9 Most Essential Jazz Artist.

Call her “Sassy,” “Sass,” or “The Divine One,” but Sarah Vaughan had a “once in a lifetime, perhaps once in several lifetimes” voice, as jazz critic Gary Giddins wrote. She won four GRAMMYs, including a Lifetime Achievement Award, and the NEA Jazz Masters Award.

Bob Perkins calls him “The Wonderful Wizard of OZcar," Ellington called him “The Maharaja of the Keyboard,” and his friends just said “O.P." But let's just call Oscar Peterson one of the greatest jazz pianists ever. The man could swing!

Called "the best friend a song ever had," Nathaniel Adams Cole was such a huge success in popular music that Capitol Records became known as “The House that Nat Built.” He was a leading jazz pianist, but it was his light and liquid singing of “Mona Lisa,” “Nature Boy,” and many other hits that won millions of fans in three decades. He's your No. 13 Essential Jazz Artist on WRTI.

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