Jazz with Bob Perkins

Monday through Thursday, 6 to 9 pm

Lovingly known as “BP with the GM” (Bob Perkins with the Good Music), BP brings you that good music just in time for dinner during your work week. His selections are like a familiar hug from Jazz Land featuring your favorite standards and vocalists such as Sarah, Ella, and Nat, some Big Band legends including the Duke and the Count, and the giants of the instrumentals like Lee Morgan, Hank Crawford, Miles, and Coltrane. Take a listen to "Ol' BP" as he calls himself...you'll be back again and again.

Take a look at this photo album of Mr. Perkins through the years.

Scroll down to see recent playlists.

 

Known for her distinctive singing, which she did most often from the keyboard, Shirley Horn studied classical music before turning to jazz in the 1950s.  In the early '60s she caught the attention of Miles  Davis, and then her career started to take off.

Tony Webb / City of Philadelphia, 2016

When the Newport Jazz Festival announced that Philadelphia-born musician Christian McBride would assume the role of its artistic director in 2017, festival founder and current producer George Wein said, "When I first met Christian McBride in 1989, I knew he was someone special.

The bass player, composer, band leader, arts and education advocate strikes people that way.  Along with his stand-out talent and engaging personality, McBride pays attention and seems to live in the moment.  That focus reaps rewards for McBride and for the rest of us.   

One hundred years ago Tuesday, in a working-poor neighborhood of Newport News, Va., a laundress and a shipyard worker had a baby girl. The father soon disappeared, and the mother and child moved north to New York. The mother died. The girl ran away and became one of the most important singers of the 20th century.

Ella Fitzgerald could sing anything: a silly novelty song, like her breakthrough hit, "A-Tisket, A-Tasket." A samba that scatted. A ballad, spooling out like satin.

It's Jazz Appreciation Month on WRTI!

Apr 21, 2017

April is here, and that means we're celebrating jazz in a special way on WRTI—all month long. The Smithsonian Institution launched Jazz Appreciation Month in 2002 to herald and celebrate the extraordinary heritage and history of jazz. And since that time we've been honoring jazz greats every April, and so has the City of Philadelphia.

Lennie Tristano: Influential, Yet Invisible

Apr 16, 2017

He played with Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie. He taught Lee Konitz and Warne Marsh. He was the true father of “free jazz.” So WRTI’s Maureen Malloy had to wonder, “Why don’t people know about Lennie Tristano?”

Celebrating 20 Years of "The Bridge" on WRTI

Apr 12, 2017

This year, J. Michael Harrison is celebrating 20 years of his show, The Bridge, on WRTI. As part of the celebration, there will be a very special installment of the Kimmel Center’s Sittin’ In, a live series of free concerts/jam sessions.

Lancaster Listeners: This Is For You!

Apr 4, 2017
Credit: DiscoverLancaster.com/Terry Ross

Good news for all of our listeners in the Lancaster area. You can now enjoy classical music and jazz on WRTI at a new frequency in your region! It’s 106.3 FM on the radio dial. The emails have already been pouring in from folks throughout the area who are so pleased with this signal that's much clearer and more reliable. Happy listening!

Opera Philadelphia's production of Charlie Parker's YARDBIRD tells the compelling story of a legendary jazz icon in a way that's meant to broaden and diversify opera’s audience. The role of saxophonist Charlie Parker was composed by Daniel Schnyder with tenor Lawrence Brownlee in mind.

Jerry Stoll / Monterey Jazz Festival

You won’t find a blue-ribbon pie at this northern California fairground this weekend. But the place will be filled with multiple stages and wall-to-wall music. Here's Meridee Duddleston's take on the Monterey Jazz Festival.

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